The Sports Industry – A Job, Career or Calling?

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Getting a job in the sports industry can be difficult at times. For some, working in sports is just a job, but for others it’s more of a career or even a calling. When you look at the coaches in the Final Four this coming weekend, being a basketball coach is their calling. For others in the industry it’s just their job. But what’s the difference?

For many people, working in the sports industry is just a job. A job is where you conduct the tasks and skills associated with your employment and is a means to generate income so you are able to meet your financial obligations and obtain material rewards. With a job, you receive no real satisfaction from your employment and your passions and interests are pursued outside of your work.

However, many people who pursue sports as their means for employment pursue it with a career in mind. A career is where you pursue your employment as a lifelong profession. The jobs you hold, the titles you earn, and the accolades you accomplish are typically all within the same industry. You get meaning from your work and you seek recognition, prestige and advancement from a job well done.

But for some, coaching and sports administration is a calling. A calling is where you are motivated by the sense of purpose your employment provides. You are intrinsically motivated by the rewards it provides and the people you serve.

So how do you view yourself within the sports industry? Is your employment a job, a career, or a calling? Regardless of how you view your employment status, make sure you work hard, have a positive attitude, are loyal, and strive to improve your skills.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com, or his new book, Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

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#1 Sports Careers Development Book

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Proven Resume and Interviewing Strategies that will separate you from your competition.  Getting Hired In College Sports will give you the edge you need to compete in the job search process. Get the job of your dreams in college sports with this step-by-step job search process from former Division I athletics director, Dr. Howard Gauthier, who has over 25 years of experience in college athletics.

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

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“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University


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Run To Your Next Job

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Last Thursday was the first day of Spring.  The Spring season symbolizes rebirth, renewal, and a fresh start.  This can easily be related to the search for a new job.  During this time of year many coaches and athletic administrators find themselves being courted by other colleges, applying for other positions, or even not having their contracts renewed.

Does this relate to you?  Are you looking for a new job?  When is the right time to make a move to a new position?  I once heard the saying that when considering taking a new job, you should “run to your next job instead of running away from your current position.”

Running away from your problems and your current job doesn’t solve anything, because the grass isn’t always greener somewhere else.  However, if you have a chance to further your career, move to a better situation, or are a better fit in a different organization, you might want to consider making a move.  So when is the right time to make a career move?  When you are able to run to your next job because of your excitement, passion, and fit in the new position.  Best of luck in your job search!

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com, or his new book, Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

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Be Prepared When The Right Job Comes Along

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Be prepared when the right job opens up.  Give yourself the book that provides you with the top job search skills and techniques.  It’s a competitive industry, so be prepared!

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

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“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University


Top 10 Interview Questions in Athletics

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

 

Bruce is working hard to prepare for his upcoming job interview.  This is the first real interview he has had since he graduated with his master’s degree in sports management.  To help with his preparations, Bruce decided to get away from the distractions of home and go to a local Starbucks.  At. Starbucks, Bruce grabbed a cup of coffee, a table in the back of the store, and spent the next two hours reading and preparing for his interview.

 

As he read through a book on career development, he uncovered the top 10 questions that are asked in an interview.  These 10 questions include:

 

  • “Walk me through your resume” or “Tell me about yourself”.
  • What are your strengths?  Weaknesses?
  • What is your management style?
  • Why do you want to leave your current position?
  • What is it about our institution that interests you? (Why do you want to work for our institution?)
  • What can you bring to our institution?
  • What is the purpose of athletics on a college campus?
  • What are your career goals?
  • What would your last supervisor say about you?
  • Why should we hire you?

In the end, Bruce was prepared for his interview and he got the job.  He did his homework, was properly prepared, and he effectively executed the strategies and techniques of the job search process.  He remembered a phrase that he read on a job search blog that read, “Ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!”

 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com or his new book, Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.  


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Prepare For Your Interview Questions

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Be prepared when the right job opens up.  Give yourself the book that provides you with the top job search skills and techniques.  It’s a competitive industry, so be prepared!

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University


Influencing The Decision of the Search Committee

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Effectively following up after your interview is one of the keys to getting the job.  Its purpose is more than just a courtesy to thank the hiring manager for taking the time to interview you.  The follow-up should also be viewed as an opportunity to influence the decision of the hiring committee.

Too often candidates who interview for a job do not follow-up with the search committee after their interview.  Instead, they wait to hear back from the hiring manager and hope they are offered the job.  Of those who do follow-up, most will just send a nice letter thanking the committee for the interview.  Of course, a nice letter is better than no follow-up correspondence, but in both cases you have blown an opportunity to influence the search committee.

After your interview, you have a tremendous opportunity to convince the search committee that you are the right person for the job.  This is usually done through a strategically typed letter, handwritten note, or a well-crafted e-mail.  However, there are certain strategies you can implement that will give you a greater opportunity for influencing the search committee.  The following are four strategies you can use during your follow-up process.

Asking Questions – Most search committees are looking for someone who can solve their problems.  If you ask the correct questions during your interview, you will know what problems and concerns face the organization.  From there you can address their problems and provide a potential solution.

Concerns About You – What concerns does each search committee member have about you as a candidate?  You will need to address each of these concerns in a personalized thank you letter.  Since you don’t know which committee member has the greatest influence on the committee, you will want to try to influence each committee member into believing you are the right candidate for the position.

Properly Timing Your Correspondence – Typically, the last person to interview has the greatest opportunity to leave the search committee with a lasting impression.  How do you combat that if you are not the last to interview?  You will want to strategically time your follow-up correspondence.  For example, if you are the first of four candidates to interview, you will want your letter of influence (thank you letter) to arrive the day before the final candidate interviews.  The strategy is that you want the committee members thinking of how great you are while they are interviewing the final person.  If your letter arrives too early, you lose impact due to the passing of time.  If your letter arrives too late, they might have already offered the job.  However, if you are the fourth of four to interview, you will need to send notes of influence very quickly.  In this situation, you might need to send an e-mail instead of a letter.  Regardless of when you interview, you will need to develop a letter of influence, addressing their concerns, and solving their problems.  This letter needs to be timed properly.

Outlast Your Opponents – Quite often the person who gets the job has outlasted the other candidates.  In other words, they didn’t allow their ego to convince them to withdraw from the search.  Sometimes other candidates are offered the job and they turn down the offer.  Outlast your competition and be ready for the offer when the hiring manager turns to you as a candidate.

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com, or his new book, Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

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Properly Following Up is the Final Stage of the Job Search Process – Make Sure You’re Prepared!

2nd edition Image

 

Be prepared when the right job opens up.  Give yourself the book that provides you with the top job search skills and techniques.  It’s a competitive industry, so be prepared!

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University