Three Steps For Excelling In The Sports Industry

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you recently graduated with your degree in sports management. Now what?

By graduating with a bachelor’s degree, you have joined an elite group that the United States Census Bureau shows has been attained by only 31% of people over the age of 25. If you received your master’s degree, you’re now in a group of just 11.5% of this 25+ population.

That’s the good news. The challenging news is that the competition for a job in the sports industry is extremely competitive and many of the people who graduate with a degree in sports management won’t find work in the industry. Now I don’t say this to discourage you, I say this to encourage you to do the “extras” that will help to separate you from the other recent graduates. More specifically you need to:

  1. Specialize in a particular area within the industry,
  2. Commit yourself to becoming an expert in this area, and
  3. Learn all you can about the sports industry.

Within this three-step philosophy is learning about the job search process within the sports industry. By truly knowing and understanding the job search process, you will be able to secure a job in the industry much quicker than your colleagues, begin gaining valuable experience, and ultimately understand the hiring process for when you have the responsibility of hiring employees.

Learning job search skills will help to separate you from other recent graduates. You will use these skills throughout your career and they are essential as you continue to learn all you can about the sports industry. Graduating with a degree in sports management is an outstanding achievement. Now you need to specialize, become an expert, and learn about the industry. Good luck in your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”
-Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University


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Eight Specific Strategies For Acing Your Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Before you set foot on campus for your interview, make sure you’re prepared. The following are eight strategies and suggestions you can use that will help you to ace your interview. Of course there are many more strategies that you might want to adopt, but these eight suggestions are strategies that many people overlook when preparing for the interview itself.

Shake Hands, Make Eye Contact, And Repeat Their Name – As you enter the interview room, you will quite often meet some or all of the people who will be interviewing you. As you are introduced to them shake their hand, make eye contact with them, and repeat their name. This will show that you are confident and will also help you to remember their name.

Write Down Their Names And Titles – As you sit down and are introduced to each person sitting around the table, write down their name, title, and any personal information they shared with you on the notepad you brought to the interview. It will be impressive to use their names as you interact with them during the interview. But this information is also critical for when you follow-up after your interview.

Make Eye Contact With And Speak To Everyone In The Room – When someone asks you a question, acknowledge them and then answer the question. As you answer the question, make eye contact with everyone in the room and address them personally. It’s important to treat every member of the search committee with respect.Remember, any one of these people might have influence on who gets hired. Attempt to make a positive impression, or even build a positive relationship, with each person you meet during your interview.

Listen And Answer The Question – When you are asked a question during the interview, listen carefully to the question that’s being asked, and answer that question. Do not ramble on and on. As you answer the question, you may want to share a personal story that will show how you have experienced a similar situation and the outcome you achieved.

Be Prepared – There’s no substitute for solid interview preparation. Before you go into your interview, know the job and research the organization. You should know the mission of the college, the structure of the department, and how the department fits into the overall organization. You should also know the successes and challenges facing the college and the department.

Relax And Be Confident – Being nervous at an interview is natural. Do your best to relax by taking a deep breath, and having meaningful conversations. Do not think that the group is judging you, instead, look at each interviewer as an individual and speak to them accordingly.

Ask Questions – When interviewing, be prepared to ask questions in order to gain the information you need that will allow you to analyze the organization. You are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. You wouldn’t want to take a bad job just because it was offered to you. In addition, the information you uncover during your interview will also be used in the follow-up process.

Closing The Interview – As the interview comes to a close, take the lead in closing the interview by asking them if there is anything else you can answer for them, explain how you’re qualified for the position, find out what the next steps are in the search process, and thank them for their time.

These are just eight of the many strategies you should include as you interview for your next job. For more tips and suggestions on the job search process, check out my new CD entitled “Preparing For Your Upcoming Job Search” at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

Follow Your Dreams Of Working In Sports

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”
-Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University


Your Job Search: Is The Job a Good “Fit” For You?

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you’re looking for a job in the sports world. Like I’ve said so many times before, the sports industry is a great place to work. But not every organization is a great place to work for everyone. The key is making sure you’re the “right fit” for the organization and they are the “right fit” for you.

Researchers have shown that the happiest and most productive employees are both a good fit within their job and within the organization where they work. Conversely, quite often when a person is not a good fit for the organization, the employee becomes frustrated, miserable, and they don’t like their job. So what is a good fit and how do we measure it?

The term “fit” is somewhat subjective. It is the degree to which characteristics of the employee and the organization match. Quite a bit has been written and published regarding how employers should look to hire employees who are a good fit for their organization, but what about finding that “right fit” as an applicant? Below are four types of employment fits to consider when applying for and accepting a job.

  • Occupational Fit – Do your skills and abilities fit with the tasks that are associated with the job? Does your education meet their requirements? If you aren’t qualified for the position, you will be frustrated at work and your boss will be frustrated with your performance. Apply for jobs that you are qualified for and where you can be successful.
  • Personal Fit – Does the job and the organization meet your personal needs? Is the compensation at a level that meets your needs? Is there adequate and affordable housing within the community? Are there employment opportunities for your spouse? Are safety issues a concern? Do the quality of the schools meet the needs of your children?
  • Organizational Fit – Are you excited and passionate about the position? Do you like the people within the organization? Can you see yourself working with them five (or seven) days per week? Is the work environment positive and uplifting? Is there the possibility for upward mobility?
  • Cultural Fit – Do you fit within the culture of the organization? To fit within the culture of the organization you will want to work for a college where you share common values, beliefs, and behaviors. Someone who fits well in a public university might not be a strong fit in a private college (or vice versa). This can extend to issues such as rural vs. urban lifestyles, working at a community college vs. a major research university, or even living in a region of the country that is significantly different from you and your upbringing.

Most likely a job won’t meet 100% of the criteria listed above, but you need to ask yourself if it meets the majority of these items? Further, does the job and the organization meet the criteria that are most important to you? Don’t just take a job because it’s available. Make sure you’re a good fit for the organization and, more importantly, they are a good fit for you.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

Follow Your Dreams Of Working In Sports

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”
-Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University


Is Your Work a Job, a Career or Your Calling?

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

If you’re reading my blog you’re most likely either working in sports or wanting to work in sports. It’s a great industry and it provides some outstanding opportunities for you to make a good living. For some, however, sports is more than just a job, it’s their calling.

Everyone needs a job. But a job is just a means to an end. It’s what you do for a living and it’s how you pay your bills and support yourself. With a job, you put in your time, collect a paycheck, don’t get too emotionally involved with the organization, and your job doesn’t interfere with your personal life.

A career, though, places a greater focus on advancing within the industry. It’s not just your job; it’s your desire to advance within the profession, to receive pay raises, to achieve more prestigious titles, to gain added responsibilities and power, and to climb the ladder within your profession. With a career comes more prestige and higher pay, but the downside is you work longer hours and you don’t have as much time for yourself outside of work.

It’s possible, however, that working in sports is so much bigger than a job or a career; it might be your calling and you were born to work in this profession. With a calling, you’re more likely to identify yourself with your work. It’s who you are and where you get your personal fulfillment. You are intertwined with your job and the people you serve. You work hard because you want to be the best you can be within your profession.

Researchers suggest that of these three job classifications, people who are pursuing their calling tend to report higher satisfaction in their work and life. So how do you view your work? Is your work a job, a career, or your calling? Ultimately you will be your best, most committed, and most successful, when you follow your dreams and follow your calling.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

Follow Your Dreams Of Working In Sports

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University