Is Social Media Preventing You From Landing That Job

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Could this be you? Over the weekend, one of your friends on Facebook posted a picture of the two of you at your Fourth of July party. The posts included a comment that you thought was funny. Of course, one good comment requires another good comment, so you respond with a risqué comment that only the two of you will understand. No big deal right? I’m not so sure.

Social media can play a very big part in determining if you get a job or not. The results of Invite’s seventh annual Social Recruiting Survey showed that “93% of recruiters will review a candidate’s social profile before making a hiring decision.”   Of these recruiters, 55% have reconsidered the candidate’s application based upon their social profile. And of those applicants who were being reconsidered, 61% were being reconsidered for negative reasons.

Eight different types of “comment” categories were studied. Results from six of the categories were listed as negative reasons for reconsidering a candidate and only one was listed as a positive reason for reconsidering them. Based upon the results of the surveys, 83% of the respondents said they have negatively reconsidered a candidate based upon references to illegal drugs, 70% for sexual posts, 66% for spelling or grammar, 63% for profanity, 51% for reference to guns, and 44% for references to alcohol. The only category that was a positive-type comment pertained to volunteering or donations to charity.

So even if your comments are in jest between friends, you really should consider how an employer might perceive your comments on social media. The following are three suggestions you should consider with regard to your profile and postings on social media.

  • Re-think your comment before submitting any posts
  • Review your profiles to make sure they are positive and up to date
  • Review your previous posts, and edit or delete anything that can be construed as being inappropriate

These are three things to think about as it pertains to your social media profile and your job search. You have worked hard to put together an outstanding resume and in writing a quality cover letter; don’t blow it by not paying attention of your social media presence. Good luck in your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Sports Jobs Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Networking: The Best Way To Get A Job In Sports

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Michael is in his first semester of his master’s degree in Sports Management. One of the classes he is taking is a course that provides an introduction to the sports industry. In addition to their textbook, the class is using the book “Getting Hired in College Sports” as a supplement. It provides the students with the techniques and strategies they need to successfully become employed in the sports industry.

Michael was excited about today’s lecture because it was on a topic he knew was important to his future, but knew little about. Today’s lecture was on the need to network within the sports profession.

The professor began the class session by encouraging each of the students to begin networking and making contacts with professionals in the industry. Intrigued by this comment, Michael asked “what do you mean by networking and how do you do it?” The professor responded by sharing that “networking is the act of building personal relationships with colleagues within your profession.  It usually starts when you meet someone within the profession, and as time passes, your relationship with them grows stronger and develops into a professional relationship.”

He continued by saying that networking is the most effective way of getting a job.  In fact, it is estimated that 65-70% of all jobs are found through personal referrals or networking connections.  This is because when you know the person who is doing the hiring, or you know somebody who knows the person doing the hiring, you are at an advantage over the other applicants.  However, networking is much more than just meeting people so you can get a job.  It is a planned process where you interact with people and build alliances.

There are several strategies you can use to build a strong professional network.  These include, but are not limited to:

  • Being active in meeting other colleagues by attending professional activities such as regional conferences, national conventions, and league meetings.
  • Being active in social gatherings.
  • Having informational interviews where you seek guidance and insights into the profession.
  • Meeting opposing coaches and athletic administrators at your team’s sporting events.
  • Seeking the guidance of a mentor.

As you attend these events and activities, you will meet potential colleagues.  And when you meet these people you will want to introduce yourself, show interest in them, ask them if they have a business card, and stay in contact with them on a regular basis.  The key is that you cultivate these connections and build alliances.

And as you build these alliances, you will meet their friends and expand your network. As your network grows, you enhance your chances of getting hired. This is because people want to hire people they know.

Creating a strong network takes time and effort, and the sooner you begin, the sooner you will get hired.  Therefore, don’t put off networking because you think its payoff is too far into the future.  Instead, be smart about your career and begin the networking process right away.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

The #1 Sports Jobs Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Proper Timing of Your Follow-up Correspondence is Crucial in the Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

It’s been five days since Cassie interviewed for an athletics marketing position at a college in Maryland. This is a job she really wants and she is anxiously waiting to hear back from the chair of the search committee.  She thought her interview went well but the waiting game continues.

Just then, her phone rang. She recognized the number – the chair of the search committee was calling.  Many thoughts rushed through Cassie’s head as she thought about the job.  This is the job she’s dreamed about, and she really wants the position.  She thought they were calling to offer her the job, but as it turns out, they were calling to let her know that they offered the job to somebody else. It turns out that the other candidate did a better job of follow-up after the interview.

Of the three people who interviewed, Cassie interviewed last. She didn’t send a follow-up “thank you” letter to the members of the search committee because she thought there wasn’t enough time for them to receive her correspondence prior to the committee making a hiring decision. This lack of follow-up cost her the job.

Cassie decided to conduct some research into how a person should follow up after an interview.  What she discovered was that you need to create a strategic plan for how you will attempt to influence the decision of the search committee. Of the several strategies you could use in your strategic plan, three techniques really stood out. These strategies include writing a “thank you” note to every person on the search committee, personalizing these notes, and properly timing your correspondence.

Personalize Your Note: Your “thank you” note needs to be thought of more like a “note of influence”. You will want to send a note of influence to each person with whom you interviewed. Tailor your note to them personally and address any issues or reservations they might have with you as a candidate. Let them know that you want the job, and let them know why you believe you are the right fit for the position. This note keeps your name in front of them, shows that you’re professional, and let’s them know that you want the job. It also eliminates any concerns they might have about you working in their organization.

Timing of Your Correspondence: Depending upon when you interview (in comparison to the other candidates) will determine what type of correspondence you send. You basically have three types of notes you can send, and which one you select depends upon when you interview and when the other candidates interview. The preferred type of note is a mailed letter. You will use a letter when there is sufficient time before the committee makes their hiring decision. The best strategy is to have the note arrive on the day the final candidate is interviewing. If the letter arrives too soon, the impact the letter has is diminished. If the letter arrives too late, the decision of the search committee is probably already made.

If you are the middle person to interview (not the first or the last) and there isn’t enough time to send an actual letter, you can send a note card before you leave town. In this scenario, you will want to have the envelopes already addressed and stamped. You will also want to have a template, or sample note, written out so you have a quick format to follow. Either a letter or note card is preferred because it will probably stay on the interviewer’s desk where they will continue to glance at the note.

If you are the last person to interview and the search committee is meeting right away, you will want to send an email. Make sure you personalize the e-mail, thank them, reassure them of your candidacy, and let them know that you want the job.

Sending a note to everyone you met, personalizing the note, and having the proper timing of your correspondence are three of the strategies that Cassie discovered as effective follow-up strategies. Several other techniques can be used to help influence the hiring decision, but these three strategies are crucial for getting the job.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

The #1 Careers Book For The Sports Profession

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University

 

 


Strategy for Writing a Quality Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Most people tend to place a considerable amount of attention on producing a quality resume, but what about your cover letter? A resume is a relatively static document that only changes when you receive more education or gain additional experiences. The cover letter, however, needs to be adjusted with every new job application.

This constant need to update your cover letter makes this a dynamic document that must be changed, tweaked, adjusted and personalized for every new job application you submit.  In order for your cover letter to be effective, you will want to be strategic in how you write the letter.  In particular, you will want to understand the purpose of your cover letter, write the letter so it is specific to the organization and the position, and make sure you follow the IBS format for creating a strategic cover letter (introduction, body and summary).

Purpose

Your cover letter and resume are the marketing materials for your job search.  They should be used to sell you to the search committee. In particular, the purpose of your cover letter is to sell you and prompt the search committee to take a closer look at your resume.  A quality cover letter can catapult you forward in the job search process.  Conversely, a poorly written cover letter can eliminate you from consideration.

Specific

Your cover letter needs to be personalized to the person who is in charge of hiring the position. This could be the hiring manager or the search committee.  Do not address your letter to “To Whom it May Concern.”  If the job announcement doesn’t specifically identify whom the hiring person is, or the chair of the search committee, you will need to do your homework so you can find out who the best person is for you to address your cover letter.  This could include addressing your application materials to the athletic director (or the person who the position reports to), the HR manager, or even the search committee – but never “to whom it may concern.”

Your cover letter should be written in a way that introduces you and your resume to the hiring manager or the search committee.  It should tell them who you are, how you are qualified for the position, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position.  More specifically, you will want to make sure you address how you meet each of the qualifications listed in the job description.

Format 

Your cover letter should not be any longer than 1 1/3 pages of 12-point font.  Preferably, you should try to limit your cover letter to one page if at all possible.  But don’t try to squeeze your letter on to one page by using 10-point font.  This font is too small and most people won’t continue to read your letter.  If they stop reading your materials, you have just been eliminated from the candidate pool.

Make sure you follow the IBS format for writing a cover letter.  This includes having a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five.  The first paragraph is considered an introduction and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for and what actions you are taking to apply for the job.

Following the introduction is the body of the letter.  The body will range between one and three paragraphs in length.  It is designed to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications for the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you possess; and what accomplishments you have achieved in similar positions.  The final paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it should explain why you are a good fit for the position.

A well-crafted cover letter will help you to sell yourself as a well-qualified applicant.  If properly prepared, the cover letter will prompt the search committee to want to take a closer look at your resume and will get you one step closer to an interview.  Therefore, in order to move your candidacy from the application process to the interview stage, it is extremely important that you have a properly formatted resume and a strategically written cover letter.  These are essential elements that are necessary for receiving an interview.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

The #1 Careers Book For The Sports Profession

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University