Strategies For Planning Your Career

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Thomas will be graduating with a degree in Sports Management at the end of the school year. Trying to get a jump on his competition, he decided to visit with a career counselor on campus and find out what is the best way for him to plan his career within the sports industry.

The career counselor shared with Thomas a step-by-step process that will help guide him as he begins to plan a career toward becoming a Division I athletic director. This formula for planning your career includes four steps and several strategies on how you should plan and position yourself for your dream job. Once you have identified your dream job, the formula has you work backwards and identify the type of job that will eventually position you for your next job. These steps and strategies include:

Step One: Identifying Your Dream Job. This includes identifying the following elements,

  • Type of Position (e.g. athletic director)
  • Industry (e.g. college level)
  • Type of Institution (e.g. Public/Private, 2-year/4-year)
  • Level of Competition (e.g. NCAA Division I)
  • Where You Want to Live (e.g. region of the country)
  • Size of the Community (e.g. urban or rural)

As you continue on in this four-step process, you will want to research which organizations meet the above criteria for your career.

Step Two: How To Get There. As you plan for your dream job, you will want to research and identify the type of education, experience, and skills you will need in order to be hired for this position.

Step Three: Positioning Yourself.  Working backwards, what type of positions will lead to your dream job? The assumption is that you are just beginning your career and that your dream job is approximately 10-15 years into the future. This also assumes that it will take approximately four career moves before you reach your dream job. These assumptions will change depending upon where you currently are in your career. Therefore, it might only take two moves instead of four. With this in mind, work backwards from your “dream” situation in step one, and identify what the logical job would be that could lead to your dream job. This is your “One-Position Removed” job.

Continue on with this format and identify the type of employment that would lead to your one-position removed job. This is your “Two-Positions Removed” job. Continue with this process by identifying your 2-Year Career Goal. Your 2-year goal should lead to your “Two-Positions Removed” job and is the job you want to secure within the next two years.

Step Four: Your Current Situation. In this step you will list your current position and then identify the strategies you need to employ in order to become hired into your next position within two years. These strategies can include:

  • Repositioning yourself within the industry
  • Obtaining an entry level Job
  • Staying in your current position and begin a networking plan
  • Volunteer to gain experience
  • Attend Graduate/Undergraduate School
  • Complete an internship (paid or unpaid)
  • Find a mentor who can give you perspective and advice

These four steps have given Thomas some insight that will help him to properly plan his career. If fact, he now has a better idea of what type of job he should be looking for when he graduates in May.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Closing The Knowing-Doing Gap In The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Ted was using the shotgun approach when applying for jobs. He was applying for every job that caught his attention. He estimated that he has applied for about 10 jobs each week over that last several months. He was frustrated that he hasn’t gotten an interview for any of these positions, so he decided to ask a career counselor for help. The counselor asked to see his resume and one of Ted’s cover letters. It didn’t take long for the counselor to provide some assistance. Ted was using the same cover letter for each position and generalizing it by addressing it to “To Whom It May Concern.” The counselor advised Ted that he should be personalizing each cover letter. Ted responded by saying that he knew this, but “he didn’t have the time to apply for all of the jobs and personalize each cover letter.” The counselor referred to Ted’s error, in not personalizing his letter, as the Knowing-Doing Gap.

The Knowing-Doing Gap is a phenomenon that authors describe as the difference (or gap) between knowing what should be done in a particular situation, and the reality of what is actually being done. As it applies to career development, your goal should be to gain the knowledge on how to properly conduct each aspect of the job search process, and then execute and perform these techniques and strategies to secure a job. The difference between your knowledge of the job search process, and how you apply this knowledge is the Knowing-Doing Gap.

Knowing

The first thing Ted needed to do was to become familiar with the proper techniques and strategies associated with the job search process. He thought he knew what the correct methods were, despite the fact that he has never taken a class or read a book on the job search process. He gained most of his knowledge about resumes and cover letters through suggestions from friends.

Doing

Once Ted learns the correct techniques and strategies for the job search process, he will want to execute these techniques and strategies correctly every time he applies for a job. The doing process takes a considerable amount of time if you are going to do it right. For each job you apply for, you will want to research the basics of the job (and the organization) so you can personalize your promotional materials, gain an understanding of who is involved in the hiring process, and determine if you are a good fit for the position and the organization. When you are invited for an interview, you will need to continue with your research and be completely prepared for both the interview stage and the follow-up stage of the job search process.

Closing the Gap

Once you know the proper techniques and strategies of the job search process, you will need to make sure that you are executing these techniques correctly so there isn’t a gap between what you know and what you do. By learning the proper techniques of the job search process, and by closing the knowing-doing gap, you will be able to secure a job that’s right for you. In Ted’s case, his cover letters weren’t properly formatted and he didn’t personalize his letters. Once he learned the proper techniques, and he executed the techniques correctly, Ted not only received an interview but he was able to secure the job he wanted.

The key is that you need to know the basic fundamental skills that are associated with each stage of the job search process and you must effectively perform each of these skills and strategies. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


There Are 250 Applicants – Why Should They Hire You?

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

There are 250 applicants for a particular job, so why should they hire you? This is a question you will probably be asked during an interview, so why should they hire you? Are you more qualified than the other applicants? Do you have the experience, or the necessary skills, to do the job? Are you a good fit with the organization? When writing your cover letter, you should write the letter with this question in mind. To answer this question, you will want to use your Personal Sales Pitch.

Your Personal Sales Pitch is the foundation for selling yourself in letters and in interviews. It should include three sections – a summary of your resume; your skills, abilities and traits; and your current situation. When answering the question, “why should we hire you”, you will want to blend these three sections together so they flow smoothly while also highlighting your experiences, skills and abilities.

In developing your Personal Sales Pitch, the first section should be a brief overview of your experiences, education, and any accomplishments you might have achieved. The second section should outline your top skills, traits, and abilities. And the final part of your sales pitch should explain your current position, your short-term career goals, and it should address why you are interviewing for another job.

The key to separating yourself from other applicants is to effectively communicate why you are the best candidate for the job. This is accomplished by writing your Personal Sales Pitch, and practice reciting it so you can communicate it with confidence and enthusiasm. This technique and strategy is one of many that are outlined in my book Getting Hired in College Sports. Good luck in your job search.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University