Five Stages Of The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you’re looking to break into, or advance within, the sports industry. But are you doing everything you can to conduct a successful job search? In my book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, I share a five-stage model that outlines the effective job search process. This model is based on research both within the sports industry and the best practices within the world of career development.

More specifically, the five segments of an effective job search include: (a) the self-assessment stage, (b) preparation stage, (c) connection stage, (d) interview stage, and (e) the follow-up stage. Mastering each of these components will help you to excel in the job search process and will help you to be competitive for the job you want. These five stages are explained in greater detail below

  • Self-Assessment Stage – In the self-assessment stage you will identify your strengths, weaknesses, skills and abilities. You will also understand what you like and dislike in a job, and what are your top personal traits. You will then create a plan that will lead you to achieving your dream job. Finally, you will systematically figure out which organizations you will want to contact in your job search.
  • Preparation Stage – During the preparation stage you will want to establish a target market contact list for the jobs you are seeking. You will also want to construct a professional resume, write a cover letter that can sell you, create a personal sales pitch, be strategic in which references you use, develop answers to the interview questions you are most likely to be asked, know how to research the organizations within your target market, and understand how to prepare for an interview.
  • Connection Stage – In the connection stage you will want to develop a job search campaign, understand how to network within the industry, and know how to promote yourself. You will also need to understand which promotional techniques you should use, how to create your brand, how to create a strategic marketing plan for yourself, and know how to control your job search.
  • Interview Stage – In the interview stage you will need to understand the proper approach for interviewing, the basic techniques you should use during an interview, and how to conduct yourself in a group interview. You will also want to understand what type of questions you should ask in the interview, what mistakes people make, and how to successfully close the interview.
  • Follow-up Stage – During this stage you will want to conduct a follow-up mini-campaign that includes thanking the members of the search committee and addressing any issues or concerns they may have about you as a candidate. You will also want to have an organized method for keeping track of each job you’ve applied for and the status of each of these searches.

These five stages are the major elements of the job search process. To land a job, you need to know, and be able to perform, each of the strategies and techniques that are within these five stages. To assist you in your job search, the book “Getting Hired in College Sports” is available as a resource. It identifies the techniques and strategies that are the best practices for all aspects of the job search process and it includes step-by-step worksheets that help you prepare for each stage of the job search. By performing these best practices you will be able to effectively execute the job search process. Best of luck on your upcoming job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is a Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 10 books and e-books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book The Positive Leader at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.

 

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Advertisements

Dual Purposes Of The Job Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Meagan was preparing for an upcoming job interview as an athletics marketing director at an NCAA Division I school in the Midwest. One of her colleagues suggested that to better prepare herself for the interview she should get the book Getting Hired in College Sports. It is the #1 sports careers book in the country and has helped thousands of people get jobs. As she read the book, one of the sections in the book discussed the dual purposes of the job interview. The book shared that very rarely does a person get offered a job during the interview itself and therefore the real purpose of the interview is two-fold: (a) To sell yourself, and (b) To gather information.

Selling Yourself

We all know that the main purpose of an interview is to sell yourself to the members of the search committee. You do this by being prepared, scripting out and practicing the answers to potential interview questions, having a quality sales pitch, dressing appropriately, knowing your strengths and skills, being up-beat and positive in your communication, being yourself, and successfully closing the interview. You will want to sell the members of the search committee that you are the expert who can solve their problems. You will also want to build a positive relationship with each of these committee members.

Gathering Information

Since the job offer rarely comes during the interview itself, a second purpose of the interview is to gather information about the organization. You will then use this information during the follow-up stage of the job search process. This information should be used in an attempt to influence the hiring decision in your favor. In other words, during the interview you will both sell yourself to members of the search committee, and you will gather information that can be used later in the process to convince the committee members that you are the best person for the job.

As you interview and gather information, you will want to ask probing questions. You should take the approach as seeing yourself as a consultant where you are analyzing the organization and their situation. You will want to gather facts, understand what the committee members are looking for in a candidate, understand what concerns they have regarding your candidacy, and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the organization.

With the information you’ve uncovered, you will now want to send follow-up correspondence to everyone you met during your interview. This correspondence is used to thank the people for their time and also to sell yourself to them. Let them know that you want the job, what skills and abilities you bring to the position, and you will want to be very strategic as you really convince them that you’re the right person for the position. Each letter or note that you send should be individually tailored. This is where your information gathering really pays dividends.

Meagan followed these strategies, interviewed well, followed up with personalized hand-written notes, and in the end, she was offered the job. These strategies came directly from the book Getting Hired in College Sports. It is the most complete and comprehensive job search book in all of sports. To get a copy of this book, go to our website at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com. Best of luck in your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his latest book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


After Your Interview, Out-live Your Competition

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

If you want the job, you need to have a great interview, properly follow-up after the interview, and out-live your competition. This is one of the concepts I discuss in my book Getting Hired in College Sports. When I say out-live your competition, I mean that you need to be patient, let the other candidates drop out of the race, so you are available when the hiring manager is offering the position. This is just one of many strategies you will want to consider when you are strategically following up after your interview. Let me give you an example of this concept.

After a job interview, many candidates get frustrated that the hiring process is taking too long and is dragging on and on. The reaction of many candidates is to pull their name from consideration. Similarly, quite often a candidate will pull their name from consideration when they find out that the hiring manager is going to offer the job to another candidate. In both cases, you have definitely eliminated yourself from consideration. But what happens if the first candidate, who is offered the job, decides to turn down the job offer? Who does the search committee turn to? Who is the next candidate in line?

Instead of dropping out, you should stay focused on the job, stay positive, continue to follow-up, and be patient. Let the other candidates drop out. If the other candidates drop out of the search process, you have now bettered your odds of being hired. This type of situation happens more than most people realize, but it doesn’t usually rise to the level of making national news.

However, this past week we did see this scenario play out in a very public manner. Over the past couple of months, Montana State University conducted a search for a new athletic director. With over 60 applicants for the position, the university’s search committee narrowed the list to five finalists. One by one, each candidate came to campus and interviewed.   When the dust settled, the job was offered to University of Utah Deputy Athletic Director Kyle Brennan. Brennan quickly accepted the job on Monday May 2, 2016 and this wrapped up the process. Right?, Wrong!

A week later, Brennan contacted Montana State President, Waded Cruzado, and informed her that he was returning to his previous position at the University of Utah. Cruzado wasted little time and contacted South Dakota State University Sr. Associate Athletic Director, Leon Costello, and offered him the job. Costello was the final candidate to interview, and he had not pulled his name from consideration. On May 10th Costello accepted the position and is now a Division I athletic director.

While we don’t know if any of the other four candidates officially withdrew their names from consideration, what we do know is that Costello made a good impression during his interview and that he was still available when the first candidate turned down the job offer. This particular scenario is a little unusual, but the process of being patient and out-living your competition is a real strategy. Good luck in your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Where To Begin Your Job Search – Answer These Four Questions

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you are beginning to look for a new job. Where do you start? How do you begin your job search? There are five stages to the job search process. These include the assessment stage, the preparation stage, the connection stage, the interview stage, and the follow-up stage. Each of these stages is so very different. To have a successful job search campaign, you will need to be able to effectively execute the fundamental skills for each of these different stages.

Everybody is at a different place in his or her job search. Some are just beginning their work life and they need to complete various self-assessments so they truly understand their personal strengths, skills, and abilities. Others need to understand how to prepare for a job search by understanding how to effectively write a cover letter and resume. Still others need to brush up on their interview skills and/or their follow-up skills.

To help you determine where to begin in your job search, and learn the appropriate job search skills, you should answer the following four questions to see which one best applies to you. By determining which of the four questions is closest to your situation, you can determine which stage of the job search process is the best place for you to focus your energies. I highly recommend that you do not skip any of the stages of the job search process, because the better you know yourself, and the better you know the job search strategies, the more likely you are to land the job of your dreams. But, by identifying where you should begin your job search, you can place the majority of your focus and energies in that particular stage of the job search process.

Questions

  1. I feel as if I am lost. I am not sure what type of job or career I want.
  2. I think I know what type of job I want, but is there a type of job that I am better suited for?
  3. I know what type of position is right for me, but I cannot get an interview.
  4. I am getting interviews but I cannot land the job.

Where Should You Begin?

If you answered #1 or #2, you need to initially focus on the testing and assessments stage. Once you have completed this stage and have a better understanding of your career path, you will begin to focus on the preparation stage. If you answered #3, your greatest focus needs to be on preparing for your search. Finally, if you answered #4, you need to review the information regarding interviewing skills and your follow-up strategies. You also need to look to expand into different types of markets within the sports industry.

By knowing which stage of the job search process you are in, you will be able to place the majority of your focus and energies in this area so you can learn and get better. You will be able to learn the fundamental skills and strategies of each stage of the job search process so you can effectively execute the various skills and strategies of the job search process. Good luck with your job search!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Getting The Job Through Proper Follow-up

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Effectively following up after your interview is one of the keys to getting the job. Your follow-up is more than just a courtesy thank you to the hiring manager. Your follow up should also be viewed as an opportunity to influence the hiring committee.

After your interview, you have a tremendous opportunity to convince the search committee that you are the right person for the job. This is usually done through a typed letter, handwritten note, or an email. Below are a few strategies you can use to help influence the search committee when you follow-up after your interview.

The first and most important follow-up strategy you should concern yourself with is in asking the right questions during your interview. Most search committees are looking to hire someone who can solve the problems of their department or organization. If you ask the correct questions during your interview, you will be able to uncover what challenges the organization is currently facing, and you can then devise a plan to solve these problems. This plan can be strategically communicated as you follow-up after your interview.

A second strategy is in building relationships with the members of the search committee. As you continue to ask questions during your interview, try to uncover what concerns each search committee member has about you as a candidate? You will need to address each of these concerns in a personalized thank you letter. Since you don’t know which committee member has the greatest influence on the committee, you will want to try to influence each committee member into believing you are the right candidate for the position.

A third strategy is for you to properly time your follow-up correspondence. For example, if you are the first of four candidates to interview, you will want your letter of influence (thank you letter) to arrive the day before the final candidate interviews. The strategy is that you want the committee members thinking of how great you are while they are interviewing the final person. If your letter arrives too early, you lose impact due to the passing of time. If your letter arrives too late, the organization might have already offered the job.

However, if you are the fourth of four to interview, you will need to send notes of influence very quickly. In this situation, you might need to send an email instead of a letter. Regardless of when you interview, you will need to develop a letter of influence, addressing their concerns, and solving their problems. And this letter needs to be properly timed.

A final strategy for following up is to understand that quite often the person who gets the job is the candidate who outlasted the other candidates. In other words, they didn’t allow their ego to convince them to withdraw from the search. Sometimes other candidates are offered the job and they turn down the offer. Outlast your competition and be ready for the offer when they turn to you as a candidate.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Separate Yourself From The Other Interviewees With These Critical Follow-up Strategies

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

This past week Austin got a new job as an assistant marketing director for a mid-major Division I athletic department on the East Coast. One thing that separated him from the other interviewees was that he understood the importance of properly following up after an interview, and he knew the various strategies and techniques a person could use to effectively follow-up.

Austin knew the importance of gathering information during his interview. He sounded like a consultant as he asked numerous questions to the members of the search committee.  He probed and uncovered information about the people, structure, culture and current situation surrounding the athletics department.  He used this information in his post-interview strategies.  In other words, the information he gathered in his interview, he used in his follow-up correspondence in an attempt to influence the hiring decision of the search committee.

To influence the hiring manager and the search committee in your favor, you need to use three strategies.  One strategy includes conducting a follow-up campaign, while another strategy includes having the proper timing of your follow-up correspondence.  A final strategy is to stay positive and outlast the other candidates.

The use of a follow-up campaign will help you to think creatively and strategically about how best to follow-up with the hiring manager and others of influence.  Many people will send a letter of thank you after their interview, but most people do not.  You, however, should conduct a follow-up campaign.  This campaign will include corresponding to everyone you met during your interview.  You will want to send a typed letter that includes thanking them for their time, touching on something that might connect the two of you (similar home town, common friends, same philosophies, etc.), and telling them what you can do for them.  This approach should be used if you are one of the first to interview.

However, if there isn’t enough time to send a letter of influence, you can use this technique and send a hand written note card or an e-mail. A personalized note card is impressive if there is enough time between your interview and the hiring of a candidate, but if time is limited an e-mail should be your strategy of choice. As you write your letter, note card or e-mail, you will want to personalize each message.  This will be impressive and help to sway the decision of the committee.

Other items you can include in a follow-up campaign are telephone calls from colleagues who will help to sell you to the hiring manager, work samples you can provide, and maybe even a proposal that might resemble a consultants report stating what you believe the organization needs and how you can fulfill their needs.  These strategies, and more, are in my book entitled Getting Hired In College Sports.  This book has helped hundreds of people to get jobs in the sports industry.  Best of luck with your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Proper Timing of Your Follow-up Correspondence is Crucial in the Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

It’s been five days since Cassie interviewed for an athletics marketing position at a college in Maryland. This is a job she really wants and she is anxiously waiting to hear back from the chair of the search committee.  She thought her interview went well but the waiting game continues.

Just then, her phone rang. She recognized the number – the chair of the search committee was calling.  Many thoughts rushed through Cassie’s head as she thought about the job.  This is the job she’s dreamed about, and she really wants the position.  She thought they were calling to offer her the job, but as it turns out, they were calling to let her know that they offered the job to somebody else. It turns out that the other candidate did a better job of follow-up after the interview.

Of the three people who interviewed, Cassie interviewed last. She didn’t send a follow-up “thank you” letter to the members of the search committee because she thought there wasn’t enough time for them to receive her correspondence prior to the committee making a hiring decision. This lack of follow-up cost her the job.

Cassie decided to conduct some research into how a person should follow up after an interview.  What she discovered was that you need to create a strategic plan for how you will attempt to influence the decision of the search committee. Of the several strategies you could use in your strategic plan, three techniques really stood out. These strategies include writing a “thank you” note to every person on the search committee, personalizing these notes, and properly timing your correspondence.

Personalize Your Note: Your “thank you” note needs to be thought of more like a “note of influence”. You will want to send a note of influence to each person with whom you interviewed. Tailor your note to them personally and address any issues or reservations they might have with you as a candidate. Let them know that you want the job, and let them know why you believe you are the right fit for the position. This note keeps your name in front of them, shows that you’re professional, and let’s them know that you want the job. It also eliminates any concerns they might have about you working in their organization.

Timing of Your Correspondence: Depending upon when you interview (in comparison to the other candidates) will determine what type of correspondence you send. You basically have three types of notes you can send, and which one you select depends upon when you interview and when the other candidates interview. The preferred type of note is a mailed letter. You will use a letter when there is sufficient time before the committee makes their hiring decision. The best strategy is to have the note arrive on the day the final candidate is interviewing. If the letter arrives too soon, the impact the letter has is diminished. If the letter arrives too late, the decision of the search committee is probably already made.

If you are the middle person to interview (not the first or the last) and there isn’t enough time to send an actual letter, you can send a note card before you leave town. In this scenario, you will want to have the envelopes already addressed and stamped. You will also want to have a template, or sample note, written out so you have a quick format to follow. Either a letter or note card is preferred because it will probably stay on the interviewer’s desk where they will continue to glance at the note.

If you are the last person to interview and the search committee is meeting right away, you will want to send an email. Make sure you personalize the e-mail, thank them, reassure them of your candidacy, and let them know that you want the job.

Sending a note to everyone you met, personalizing the note, and having the proper timing of your correspondence are three of the strategies that Cassie discovered as effective follow-up strategies. Several other techniques can be used to help influence the hiring decision, but these three strategies are crucial for getting the job.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

The #1 Careers Book For The Sports Profession

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University