Preparing For Your Upcoming Skype Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Todd was both excited and nervous as he hung up the telephone.  Four weeks ago he submitted his resume and cover letter for a marketing position at a Mid-level Division I institution in New York. Today, Todd was asked to interview with the search committee via a Skype interview.

He was excited because this is a job that he really wants, but Todd is also nervous because his initial interview is via Skype. Todd has never used Skype before and he knows that if he is going to make a great first impression, he needs to be prepared. The first thing he did was to contact a friend who regularly uses Skype and asked for some help and advice.

As Todd was preparing for his interview and learning more about the Skype process, he concluded that in order to have an effective Skype interview, he needed to concern himself with four broad areas:

  • Computer related issues
  • The physical setting
  • Practice and preparation
  • The interview

Todd knows that in order to have a quality interview, he needs to have the proper computer equipment and software.  This includes having a relatively new computer (within the last five years) with a webcam, a microphone, and speakers.  The interviewee would also need access to an Internet connection and have a Skype account.

Todd found that when setting the location and atmosphere for the interview, you should select a place where you won’t be interrupted or distracted.  Quite often, a home office is best because it has a professional look and feel.  If added lighting is needed, a person will want to set up a table lamp about four feet behind the computer.  And to make sure that the setting looks professional, both the desk and surrounding background must be clutter free.

Once the computer equipment and software are coordinated, and the interview setting has been established, you will now need to practice using Skype and all of the computer settings.  Prior to the actual interview, you will want to practice calling and receiving Skype calls, and practice answering interview questions.  To make sure you look good on the video, you will want to sit back a little further from the computer and make sure that your face and shoulders appear in the video screen.

During the actual interview, a person will want to have their cell phone close by and ready in case the Internet connection is lost.  Make sure you have the cell number of the interviewers in case this happens.  But also make sure that your cell phone is turned off during the interview. You don’t want your phone ringing during this session. Other items you will want to consider during the interview session is to have your computer plugged into an electrical outlet so the battery doesn’t die, dress in a professional manner, keep other computer programs closed so the computer doesn’t slow down, and as you interact with the search committee look into the camera and not at the computer screen.

As you prepare the room for your interview, you might want to display your resume, sales pitch, and the answers to interview questions behind the computer so you can glance and refer to this information without looking awkward to those who are interviewing you (similar to a television news anchor using a teleprompter).  In the end, Todd was very well prepared for his Skype interview, he performed well, and was invited for an on-campus interview.  

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book The Positive Leader at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Five Stages Of The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you’re looking to break into, or advance within, the sports industry. But are you doing everything you can to conduct a successful job search? In my book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, I share a five-stage model that outlines the effective job search process. This model is based on research both within the sports industry and the best practices within the world of career development.

More specifically, the five segments of an effective job search include: (a) the self-assessment stage, (b) preparation stage, (c) connection stage, (d) interview stage, and (e) the follow-up stage. Mastering each of these components will help you to excel in the job search process and will help you to be competitive for the job you want. These five stages are explained in greater detail below

  • Self-Assessment Stage – In the self-assessment stage you will identify your strengths, weaknesses, skills and abilities. You will also understand what you like and dislike in a job, and what are your top personal traits. You will then create a plan that will lead you to achieving your dream job. Finally, you will systematically figure out which organizations you will want to contact in your job search.
  • Preparation Stage – During the preparation stage you will want to establish a target market contact list for the jobs you are seeking. You will also want to construct a professional resume, write a cover letter that can sell you, create a personal sales pitch, be strategic in which references you use, develop answers to the interview questions you are most likely to be asked, know how to research the organizations within your target market, and understand how to prepare for an interview.
  • Connection Stage – In the connection stage you will want to develop a job search campaign, understand how to network within the industry, and know how to promote yourself. You will also need to understand which promotional techniques you should use, how to create your brand, how to create a strategic marketing plan for yourself, and know how to control your job search.
  • Interview Stage – In the interview stage you will need to understand the proper approach for interviewing, the basic techniques you should use during an interview, and how to conduct yourself in a group interview. You will also want to understand what type of questions you should ask in the interview, what mistakes people make, and how to successfully close the interview.
  • Follow-up Stage – During this stage you will want to conduct a follow-up mini-campaign that includes thanking the members of the search committee and addressing any issues or concerns they may have about you as a candidate. You will also want to have an organized method for keeping track of each job you’ve applied for and the status of each of these searches.

These five stages are the major elements of the job search process. To land a job, you need to know, and be able to perform, each of the strategies and techniques that are within these five stages. To assist you in your job search, the book “Getting Hired in College Sports” is available as a resource. It identifies the techniques and strategies that are the best practices for all aspects of the job search process and it includes step-by-step worksheets that help you prepare for each stage of the job search. By performing these best practices you will be able to effectively execute the job search process. Best of luck on your upcoming job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 10 books and e-books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book The Positive Leader at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.

 

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Preparing For Your Phone Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Periodically I receive questions about how a person should prepare for their upcoming job search or their upcoming interview. I appreciate you asking me advice about the job search process and I welcome your questions. This week was no different. I received an e-mail from Bill (not his real name) who has a telephone interview for a position within a college athletic department.

Bill asked how he should go about properly preparing for his upcoming phone interview and what type of questions he should ask. These are great questions; so let’s discuss some thoughts on this topic.

As you prepare for your upcoming telephone interview there are some thoughts that you will want to focus on. For example, the interview is about them (the organization) and not you. Let me explain this.

The reason the job is open is because the organization has a need. Without this need, the position wouldn’t exist. So the over-riding questions you need to answer are “what are their needs, how can I solve their problems, and what makes me the best fit for this position and their organization?”

So let’s examine these thoughts. First, how do you prepare for the phone interview? You will want to make sure that your phone is charged and is in good working order. Also, you will want to make sure that there is good telephone coverage or service in the area, and that you have a location for your interview where you will have privacy and no distractions. I also like to dress up a little bit so I feel I’m ready for the interview. This will help with your confidence, which will come across loudly in your conversation. Also, know the answers to potential interview questions, and what questions you want to ask the search committee. You will want to practice your answers so you are smooth in your delivery. A lack of preparation will sound like you are unsure of yourself or even that you’re not qualified for the position.

To help you prepare for answering the interview questions you will want to develop a personal sales pitch. Also known as an elevator speech, your personal sales pitch is a short statement of who you are and what makes you qualified for the position for which you are interviewing. Your pitch will include three subsections that you can use to sell yourself. And if you are asked a question that you’re unsure of the answer, you can revert back to your personal sales pitch. During a phone interview, I like to have my personal sales pitch (and answers to interview questions) lying in front of me or taped to the wall so I can glance at a key word and remember the answer. This is a little trick I’ve used to help me during my telephone interviews. But make sure you’re not reading the answers word for word. This would come across poorly on the other end of the telephone. These are some thoughts on how to prepare for your phone interview. Now let’s examine Bill’s second question – what questions should I ask the search committee?

Asking questions during an interview is a vitally important aspect of the process. If you don’t have any questions for the search committee, that’s a clear sign that you’re not qualified for the position. So what type of questions should you ask? When interviewing for a job I always like to think of myself as a consultant who is trying to uncover the problems of the organization so I can propose solutions to their problems and also so I can sell myself as the “consultant” they want to hire. As a consultant you will want to ask questions such as who, what, why, when, where and how come. Answers to questions will spur on additional questions. Ultimately, you will want to ask yourself “why should they hire me?” You need to answer this question and help them to believe you are the best person for the job.

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Dual Purposes Of The Job Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Meagan was preparing for an upcoming job interview as an athletics marketing director at an NCAA Division I school in the Midwest. One of her colleagues suggested that to better prepare herself for the interview she should get the book Getting Hired in College Sports. It is the #1 sports careers book in the country and has helped thousands of people get jobs. As she read the book, one of the sections in the book discussed the dual purposes of the job interview. The book shared that very rarely does a person get offered a job during the interview itself and therefore the real purpose of the interview is two-fold: (a) To sell yourself, and (b) To gather information.

Selling Yourself

We all know that the main purpose of an interview is to sell yourself to the members of the search committee. You do this by being prepared, scripting out and practicing the answers to potential interview questions, having a quality sales pitch, dressing appropriately, knowing your strengths and skills, being up-beat and positive in your communication, being yourself, and successfully closing the interview. You will want to sell the members of the search committee that you are the expert who can solve their problems. You will also want to build a positive relationship with each of these committee members.

Gathering Information

Since the job offer rarely comes during the interview itself, a second purpose of the interview is to gather information about the organization. You will then use this information during the follow-up stage of the job search process. This information should be used in an attempt to influence the hiring decision in your favor. In other words, during the interview you will both sell yourself to members of the search committee, and you will gather information that can be used later in the process to convince the committee members that you are the best person for the job.

As you interview and gather information, you will want to ask probing questions. You should take the approach as seeing yourself as a consultant where you are analyzing the organization and their situation. You will want to gather facts, understand what the committee members are looking for in a candidate, understand what concerns they have regarding your candidacy, and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the organization.

With the information you’ve uncovered, you will now want to send follow-up correspondence to everyone you met during your interview. This correspondence is used to thank the people for their time and also to sell yourself to them. Let them know that you want the job, what skills and abilities you bring to the position, and you will want to be very strategic as you really convince them that you’re the right person for the position. Each letter or note that you send should be individually tailored. This is where your information gathering really pays dividends.

Meagan followed these strategies, interviewed well, followed up with personalized hand-written notes, and in the end, she was offered the job. These strategies came directly from the book Getting Hired in College Sports. It is the most complete and comprehensive job search book in all of sports. To get a copy of this book, go to our website at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com. Best of luck in your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his latest book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Make Sure You Prepare For These Seven Interview Questions

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Jake is excited for his upcoming interview.  After six years as an assistant coach, Jake is looking to move up in the coaching profession.

After working under an extremely successful coach, Jake believes now is the perfect time to make the move to a head coaching position. He has experience in all aspect of running a program including preseason conditioning, on-court coaching, recruiting, scouting, and player development. What he doesn’t have experience in is interviewing for a job.

To better prepare himself for his interview, Jake sought the help of a veteran coach and his mentor, Bob Cross. Coach Cross was Jake’s head coach in college and has been a great mentor ever since. So naturally, Jake sought his advice and guidance when it came to interviewing for a head coaching position. Coach Cross shared various interview preparation tips and strategies, and then shared seven interviewing questions that Jake should be prepared to answer during the interview. These seven questions include:

  1. Tell us about yourself.
  2. What are your strengths?  Weaknesses?
  3. What is your coaching philosophy and coaching style?
  4. What is your vision for the program?
  5. Give us an example of a difficult problem you’ve had to deal with regarding a student-athlete and how you handle the situation.
  6. What is your plan for the first 90 days on the job?
  7. Why should we hire you?

In the end, Jake aced his interview and he is excited for his new challenge as a head coach. He paid his dues, sought the guidance of a mentor, and was prepared for his interview. He is now actively planning for his first season as a head coach.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Where To Begin Your Job Search – Answer These Four Questions

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you are beginning to look for a new job. Where do you start? How do you begin your job search? There are five stages to the job search process. These include the assessment stage, the preparation stage, the connection stage, the interview stage, and the follow-up stage. Each of these stages is so very different. To have a successful job search campaign, you will need to be able to effectively execute the fundamental skills for each of these different stages.

Everybody is at a different place in his or her job search. Some are just beginning their work life and they need to complete various self-assessments so they truly understand their personal strengths, skills, and abilities. Others need to understand how to prepare for a job search by understanding how to effectively write a cover letter and resume. Still others need to brush up on their interview skills and/or their follow-up skills.

To help you determine where to begin in your job search, and learn the appropriate job search skills, you should answer the following four questions to see which one best applies to you. By determining which of the four questions is closest to your situation, you can determine which stage of the job search process is the best place for you to focus your energies. I highly recommend that you do not skip any of the stages of the job search process, because the better you know yourself, and the better you know the job search strategies, the more likely you are to land the job of your dreams. But, by identifying where you should begin your job search, you can place the majority of your focus and energies in that particular stage of the job search process.

Questions

  1. I feel as if I am lost. I am not sure what type of job or career I want.
  2. I think I know what type of job I want, but is there a type of job that I am better suited for?
  3. I know what type of position is right for me, but I cannot get an interview.
  4. I am getting interviews but I cannot land the job.

Where Should You Begin?

If you answered #1 or #2, you need to initially focus on the testing and assessments stage. Once you have completed this stage and have a better understanding of your career path, you will begin to focus on the preparation stage. If you answered #3, your greatest focus needs to be on preparing for your search. Finally, if you answered #4, you need to review the information regarding interviewing skills and your follow-up strategies. You also need to look to expand into different types of markets within the sports industry.

By knowing which stage of the job search process you are in, you will be able to place the majority of your focus and energies in this area so you can learn and get better. You will be able to learn the fundamental skills and strategies of each stage of the job search process so you can effectively execute the various skills and strategies of the job search process. Good luck with your job search!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Getting Organized For Your Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Last week I was visiting with a colleague and he shared a story about a time when he had a horrible interview. He wasn’t prepared for the interview and it just didn’t go well. Getting a job in the sports industry takes great preparation and organization. To help you with your organization, I have created a worksheet I call an Interview Preparation Form. It is a worksheet that’s designed to help you prepare for your job interview.

The Interview Preparation Form is a “cheat sheet” you can use to outline your answers to possible interview questions. It also outlines your personal sales pitch, provides bullet points to the stories you want to share when answering questions, provides a list of questions you want to ask the search committee, and it provides an organized method for effectively closing the interview. The Interview Preparation Form consists of the following five sections:

Section One – Your answers to potential interview questions. In this section you will list the questions you believe might be asked in an interview and then provide your corresponding answers.

Section Two – Your personal sales pitch. Your Personal Sales Pitch is the foundation for selling yourself during the interview. Your pitch should include three sections – a summary of your resume; your skills, abilities and traits; and your current situation. Depending on the question you are asked, you can use the pitch in its entirety or just one of the three sections.

Section Three – Outline five stories you can share with the search committee.   People like to hear stories. This section helps you prepare for sharing examples of your experiences through the use of stories.

Section Four – Questions you should ask. You need to be prepared to ask questions that will help you to better understand the job, the organization, the strengths and needs of the organization, and what the search committee is looking for in their new hire. This information will be used during the follow-up stage.

Section Five – Closing the interview. This section is an organized method for concluding the interview. It allows you to sell yourself to the search committee and it lets them know that you are interested in the job.

Once you have written your Interview Preparation Form, you will want to type it out in a Word document and practice answering these questions so they flow easily during the interview. In fact, when interviewing over the telephone, you might want to spread your cheat sheet out on a desk or table so you can glance down and remind yourself of the answer to a particular question. But don’t read directly from your form. The interviewers can tell if you’re reading a script. Instead, just refer to the bullet points of your stories, to the answers of potential interview questions, and to the questions you want to ask the committee. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to practice answering questions and reciting your personal sales pitch. This practice will allow you to come across fluid and confident in your communications.

I hope this information is helpful. You can read more about the Interview Preparation Form and the entire job search process in my book Getting Hired in College Sports. Remember that it is critical that you are properly prepared for your job search, because ultimately, the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University