Optimism and Your Job Search

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Last year Daniel was “downsized” when his contract was not renewed after five years as the athletic director at a small college in the Northeast. The college had hired a new president and the president wanted his own person in this position. At first Daniel was confident he would get another job relatively quickly since he has the reputation of being a hard worker and being a quality administrator. But the new job never came.

Daniel had interviewed for several other jobs, but the outcome was always the same – he didn’t get the job. After six months of unemployment his attitude became negative and he started becoming depressed. It was at this point that he sought the advice from a well-respected colleague. In their discussion, the colleague recommended that Daniel research the best methods for developing his job search skills, and search for strategies that would help him to have a more positive attitude.

Daniel purchased a book on career development in college sports, and as he read about the proper techniques he should be using during the interview process, he was surprised at how much he needed to learn in order to be competitive in the job search process.  He then found a blog on the Internet by Brian Tracy that discussed the need for being an optimist.  In his blog, entitled “Be an Optimist at All Times”, Tracy discussed the need for mental fitness so you can feel good about yourself and your situation.  Tracy outlined seven items a person should focus on in order to develop a positive attitude.  These seven items are listed below and include the lessons Daniel took away from each item.

  • Control Your Reactions and Responses – You need to be aware of how you react and respond to your situation.  People like to be around positive people, and your attitude will affect your relationship with the members of the search committee. Therefore, you need to have a positive and optimistic attitude.
  • Isolate the Incident – Stay positive and know that each interview is an isolated event. In other words, your next interview is disconnected from your previous interviews and you need to be optimistic that your next interview will lead to a job offer.
  • See Setbacks as Temporary Events – Know that you won’t get every job you interview for and that you need to be persistent in your job search. This is just a part of the job search process.
  • Don’t Take Failure Personally – Quite often a person doesn’t get the job because the position isn’t the right fit for you, or someone else had an “in” with the organization. Understand this, don’t take it personally, and move on with the process.
  • Remain Calm and Objective – The job search process can be frustrating. You need to accept this, learn along the way, and stay positive.
  • Take the Long View – Refuse to take the rejection letter personally, and know that it’s a numbers game.  The more interviews you have, the more likely you are to be hired.  It all takes time.
  • Action Exercises – Continually provide yourself with positive self-talk and remind yourself that your situation is temporary. Stay strong and look at each job interview as not being connected with the previous interview, but recognize when things go wrong. You will want to analyze your performance from each interview and improve your performance for your next interview.

It took Daniel another two months to land a job as an athletic director at another small college. He credits his success in securing the job to learning the proper job search skills, and from the teachings of optimism by Brian Tracy. Daniel is now a big believer in the power of positive thinking.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Advertisements

The Competition For Jobs In The Sports Industry Is Stiff, Prepare Accordingly

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Competition for jobs in the sports industry is stiff, therefore you need to prepare accordingly. In a recent article by Bill King, published in the Street & Smith’s Sports Business Journal, he shared that there are roughly 24,000 undergraduate students and another 6,000 graduate students who are studying Sports Management within the United States. When these students graduate, they join approximately 8,000 students who graduated the previous year and are still looking for jobs. I share these statistics not to scare you, but to share the realities of the job market within the sports industry.

There is good news however. You can use a four-prong strategic approach that will give you a leg up on your competition. In other words, this strategy will give you, or your students, an advantage in the sports job market. This four-prong strategy will help you to become employable so you are able to beat out your competition. Each of the four individual prongs will provide you with a best practices strategy. And by utilizing all four strategies, you are almost assured a job. These four prongs include:

  • Seeking Out a Mentor
  • Beginning To Network
  • Gaining Experience
  • Gaining The Correct Job Search Skills and Strategies

Over the course of the next month or so, I will write my blog so that I address each of these prongs. But in the meantime, you should consider researching the skills and strategies that you need in order to have a successful job search within the sports industry. One of the best reference tools for gaining these skills and strategies is the book Getting Hired in College Sports. This book is being used in many of the sports management programs throughout the country, and it has helped hundreds of people to get a job in the sports world. Whether you decide to use this reference book or not, you need to understand and begin to practice the proper job search skills and strategies. Please let me know if I can help you in your job search

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Three Qualities Employers Look For When Hiring in The Sports Industry

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

This past summer I led I let a group of graduate students at Idaho State University in a class entitled Athletics in the West. It’s a weeklong field trip where we tour various athletic facilities and interview athletic professionals both at the college level and professional level so that the students can get a feel for the industry. This was my first year of teaching this class.

In years past the class went from Idaho through Wyoming and Colorado, and back home. They stopped at various Division I athletic departments, Division II athletic departments, and professional sport organizations. This summer I decided that the class would head a different direction. We decided to explore the differences between various organizations in Idaho and Washington. We began by traveling from Pocatello over to Boise and up to Lewiston Idaho. There we began our adventure by touring the athletic facilities at Lewis-Clark State College. They have a visionary athletic director who presented some of the best athletic facilities in the NAIA. Later that day we toured the athletic facilities at the University of Idaho. Their associate athletic director was so gracious in providing his time, vision, and insights into the profession. This first day allowed us to compare the differences in facilities, staffing levels, vision, and strategies between a high-level NAIA school compared with a Non-Power 5 athletic department. The difference in facilities and staffing levels was significant. The Division I institution was bigger in everything – staffing, facilities, vision, and strategy. The employees were similar though – very nice, friendly, and professional. During our visits at both schools, one of our students asked each athletic professional what they look for when hiring people.

The next day we visited the athletic department at Washington State University. The senior associate athletic director provided a tremendous opportunity for our class. He gave us a thorough tour of their new and renovated facilities, their branding strategies, and provided insights into the industry that can only be gained by visiting with a seasoned college athletic administrator. After a three-hour tour of the athletic facilities and picking-the brain of one of the most respected athletic administrators in the country, our campus tour moved across campus and concluded with a two-hour visit of the recreation department. Once again, at both stops, the student asked the same question about what they look for when hiring people.

This theme continued as the next day we visited with a first class football coach at the University of Washington. We toured their facilities, and visited on the vision and culture that makes Huskies football outstanding. Our trip concluded with the class touring CenturyLink Field (Seahawks and Sounders) and Safeco Field (Mariners). With each stop came the same question – What do you look for when hiring employees.

While the answer to this question varied slightly from each athletic professional, there was a definite pattern that crossed over to every person at every sports organization. What these athletic professionals are looking for when hiring employees is loyalty, work ethic, and positive attitude. Our students thought the answers would be more in alignment with having a certain type of college degree, a certain number of years of experience, or even a certain type of skill. These latter qualities are either part of the minimum qualifications for the job, and therefore every applicant has them, or they can be gained on the job. The bottom line is – employers want positive people who work hard and are loyal. If a future employer were to call your references, would they say that you are an upbeat positive person, that you work hard, and that you are loyal? Just some food for thought.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Ten Elements of an Effective Job Search Campaign

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Mark awoke before his I-phone’s alarm was set to go off at 6:45am.  He had a restless nights sleep because of his excitement for his informational interview with Thomas Griffin. Tom, as his friends referred to him, is a retired college athletic director who mentors young people in their search for a career in the sports industry.  Mark’s uncle had played college basketball with Tom in the late 1960’s and referred Mark to him.

Tom Griffin had a 40-year career as a college coach and athletic director, and he is now giving back to the community by mentoring young people who are interested in careers in college sports.  The two would meet at a local coffee shop where Tom does most of mentoring.

As Mark arrived at the coffee shop, Tom welcomed him with a bright smile and a firm handshake. After about 15 minutes of small talk and introductions, the two began to talk about working in college sports. Tom first described how college athletic departments are structured and then shared the different types of jobs that exist in an athletic department. As they continued with their discussions, Tom got into more detail about how to get a job in college sports. He identified 10 elements that are necessary for conducting a successful job search campaign.  He told Mark that these elements are from the book “Getting Hired in College Sports”.  He went on to say that it’s a “how to” book for the job seeker and Tom asks that each of his mentees get a copy so they can use the worksheets that are included.  As they continued with their conversation, Tom gave Mark a handout that listed these 10 job search elements. These elements are a necessity for job seekers to know in order to secure a job.  The following are the 10 elements that Tom shared with Mark:

  1. You must properly assess your skills, abilities, strengths and traits
  2. You need to properly plan your career
  3. You need to establish a target market for your job search campaign
  4. You need to effectively promote yourself with a well-written cover letter and resume
  5. You need to create a compelling Personal Sales Pitch
  6. You need to complete an Interview Preparation Form
  7. You need to prepare to answer interview questions
  8. You need to organize your job search campaign
  9. You need to know the proven strategies for executing a successful job interview
  10. You need to be strategic in following-up after your interview

The two continued to talk for over two hours and in the end they agreed to continue to work together so Mark can develop all 10 elements of the job search process. This will help him to position himself for an outstanding career in the world of college sports. For more information on the job search process, or the book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, feel free to contact Howard Gauthier at howard@sportscareersinstitute.com or go to his website at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Closing The Knowing-Doing Gap In The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Ted was using the shotgun approach when applying for jobs. He was applying for every job that caught his attention. He estimated that he has applied for about 10 jobs each week over that last several months. He was frustrated that he hasn’t gotten an interview for any of these positions, so he decided to ask a career counselor for help. The counselor asked to see his resume and one of Ted’s cover letters. It didn’t take long for the counselor to provide some assistance. Ted was using the same cover letter for each position and generalizing it by addressing it to “To Whom It May Concern.” The counselor advised Ted that he should be personalizing each cover letter. Ted responded by saying that he knew this, but “he didn’t have the time to apply for all of the jobs and personalize each cover letter.” The counselor referred to Ted’s error, in not personalizing his letter, as the Knowing-Doing Gap.

The Knowing-Doing Gap is a phenomenon that authors describe as the difference (or gap) between knowing what should be done in a particular situation, and the reality of what is actually being done. As it applies to career development, your goal should be to gain the knowledge on how to properly conduct each aspect of the job search process, and then execute and perform these techniques and strategies to secure a job. The difference between your knowledge of the job search process, and how you apply this knowledge is the Knowing-Doing Gap.

Knowing

The first thing Ted needed to do was to become familiar with the proper techniques and strategies associated with the job search process. He thought he knew what the correct methods were, despite the fact that he has never taken a class or read a book on the job search process. He gained most of his knowledge about resumes and cover letters through suggestions from friends.

Doing

Once Ted learns the correct techniques and strategies for the job search process, he will want to execute these techniques and strategies correctly every time he applies for a job. The doing process takes a considerable amount of time if you are going to do it right. For each job you apply for, you will want to research the basics of the job (and the organization) so you can personalize your promotional materials, gain an understanding of who is involved in the hiring process, and determine if you are a good fit for the position and the organization. When you are invited for an interview, you will need to continue with your research and be completely prepared for both the interview stage and the follow-up stage of the job search process.

Closing the Gap

Once you know the proper techniques and strategies of the job search process, you will need to make sure that you are executing these techniques correctly so there isn’t a gap between what you know and what you do. By learning the proper techniques of the job search process, and by closing the knowing-doing gap, you will be able to secure a job that’s right for you. In Ted’s case, his cover letters weren’t properly formatted and he didn’t personalize his letters. Once he learned the proper techniques, and he executed the techniques correctly, Ted not only received an interview but he was able to secure the job he wanted.

The key is that you need to know the basic fundamental skills that are associated with each stage of the job search process and you must effectively perform each of these skills and strategies. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Excelling In Your Current Job

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Most of my blogs talk about how to get a job in college sports, but what about your current job? What do you need to do to be your best in the position you currently have? Below are four principles you should focus on, and be intentional about, as you seek to excel in your current job.

Core Duties – What are the tasks and duties of your job? These are the core responsibilities of your position. Anything less than doing them, and doing them well, means that you aren’t doing your job. Make sure you do your job and do it well.

Over Deliver – One of the keys to excelling in your job is for you to over deliver. Be open to taking on extra assignments. Consider volunteering for tough jobs or extra assignments.

Be Professional – You will want to be professional in your appearance and actions. Make sure you look professional in how you dress. Remember the old saying “dress for your next position.” In addition, you will want to avoid actions that could be viewed in a negative manner. Don’t be one of those persons who arrives a little late and sneaks out a little early. And by all means steer clear of office gossip.

Build Positive Relationships – People like to be around optimists. Be upbeat, positive and high energy. Focus on building positive relationships with your boss, colleagues, and staff.

These four principles will help you to be your best and be viewed in a positive light. This in turn will help you to excel in your current job.

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Strategies For Your Current Job Search

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Tracy and Ron are both searching for a job in the sports world.  Tracy is a soccer coach who is looking to advance in her career and Ron recently graduated with a master’s degree in Sports Management.  While Tracy is very focused on her career, Ron isn’t sure what he wants to do.

Tracy knows that she wants to advance in the coaching profession but is having a difficult time getting an interview.  Ron on the other hand is confused as to what type of job or career he wants.  They both seek the assistance of a career coach to help them with their search process.

The career coach shares that there are five stages to the job search process:

Assessment Stage – In this stage of the job search process you will identify your strengths, skills, abilities and traits. You will also familiarize yourself with the various types of jobs within the sports industry and plan out your career.

Preparation Stage – During the preparation stage you will write your resume, cover letter, sales pitch, and reference list. You will also prepare yourself for an interview by developing strategies and answers to the most popular interview questions.

Connection Stage – In the connection stage you will develop your plan for how you will network and promote yourself to the organizations where you’d like to work. You will begin to brand yourself and create a marketing plan for your career.

Interview Stage – During this stage you will prepare yourself for every aspect of a job interview. You will learn the basics of the interviewing process, understand how to interview, know what types of mistakes people make, what types of questions to ask during the interview, and how to successfully close the interview.

Follow-up Stage – During the follow-up stage you will create a very detailed strategy about how you will influence the hiring decision of the search committee. This includes what strategies to use during your follow-up, addressing possible issues or concerns the committee might have with you, and knowing how to negotiate your salary.

In Tracy’s situation, the career coach suggested that since she knows what type of job she wants, the majority of her energies should be focused on the preparation and connection stages.  The preparation stage would have her review her cover letter, resume, references, and sales pitch to make sure they are formatted correctly and written correctly.  She needs to make sure that her sales tools are excellent, and that they are effectively selling her.  The career coach continued by explaining that most jobs are secured through networking, and that the connection stage would help her to be active and effective in networking within the profession.

In Ron’s situation, the career coach suggested that he begin his job search process in the assessment stage.  He needs to understand the various types of jobs that exist in the sports industry, and understand what type of job best fits his personality, skills, and lifestyle.  The career coach went on to share that during the assessment stage, Ron will also discover his strengths, weaknesses, skills, and abilities.  These will help him as he identifies what type of career he wants to pursue, and in developing his resume, cover letter and sales pitch.

So where are you in your current job search?

  • If you are lost and not knowing what type of job you want, you’ll start with the assessment stage.
  • If you know what type of job you want but aren’t getting interviews, you’ll need to assess your situation and focus on both the preparation and connection stages.
  • If you are getting interviews but not job offers, you’ll want to focus on both the interview and follow-up stages.

It is critical to your job search that you know which stage of the job search process you’re in.  Once you know which stage you’re in, you can place your focus and energies into becoming proficient in the basic fundamental skills within that stage. Good luck with your job search!

 

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University