Questions Not To Ask In An Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Sometimes it’s not what you do or say in life, sometimes it’s what you don’t do or say. Take Jim for example. Jim has been searching for a job for a couple of months since graduating from college. He has struggled in his first couple of interviews so he decided to do some research into the proper techniques a person should use during an interview.

As he was reading through a book on career development, he ran across a section that discussed the types of questions a person should not ask during a job interview. The author reasoned that the goal of the interview is to build positive relationships during your meetings and that you need to show the hiring manager that you have done your research. By asking the following types of questions, it is clear to the search committee that you have not adequately prepared for the interview.

  • Avoid asking questions that are answered in the institution’s general information or on their website (e.g. number of sports offered, the record of last years team, etc). These types of questions will let the interviewer know that you did not do your homework. But by all means ask questions if some information is not clear to you.
  • Avoid asking about the salary or benefits in the first interview. This is a major mistake. Quite often, the salary can be found on the Internet or in a published article. The interviewer may choose to bring this information up, but you should not initiate the topic. By asking about the salary too early in the process, it will give the impression that you are more concerned with what is in it for you. In fact, the interviewer may give you the salary range up front to see if you are still interested in the position. If the salary is a bit low, do not acknowledge this; rather allow the process to take its course. If you are their choice, you can attempt to negotiate a better salary. However, do not think that you can get the hiring manager to increase the salary by 25-50 percent. This is a waste of time for both you and the hiring institution.
  • Avoid asking any personal questions or questions that will put the hiring manager on the defensive. These may include, but are not limited to: their age, race, religion, health, or marital status.
  • Avoid asking questions that have already been answered in the interview session. If some of the questions on your list have already been answered during the current interview, do not repeat them. However, feel free to ask the same question to a different group of people within the organization, especially if you are not comfortable with the answer you received.

These are some of the basic interviewing techniques that Jim uncovered in his research. Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Five Stages Of The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you’re looking to break into, or advance within, the sports industry. But are you doing everything you can to conduct a successful job search? In my book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, I share a five-stage model that outlines the effective job search process. This model is based on research both within the sports industry and the best practices within the world of career development.

More specifically, the five segments of an effective job search include: (a) the self-assessment stage, (b) preparation stage, (c) connection stage, (d) interview stage, and (e) the follow-up stage. Mastering each of these components will help you to excel in the job search process and will help you to be competitive for the job you want. These five stages are explained in greater detail below

  • Self-Assessment Stage – In the self-assessment stage you will identify your strengths, weaknesses, skills and abilities. You will also understand what you like and dislike in a job, and what are your top personal traits. You will then create a plan that will lead you to achieving your dream job. Finally, you will systematically figure out which organizations you will want to contact in your job search.
  • Preparation Stage – During the preparation stage you will want to establish a target market contact list for the jobs you are seeking. You will also want to construct a professional resume, write a cover letter that can sell you, create a personal sales pitch, be strategic in which references you use, develop answers to the interview questions you are most likely to be asked, know how to research the organizations within your target market, and understand how to prepare for an interview.
  • Connection Stage – In the connection stage you will want to develop a job search campaign, understand how to network within the industry, and know how to promote yourself. You will also need to understand which promotional techniques you should use, how to create your brand, how to create a strategic marketing plan for yourself, and know how to control your job search.
  • Interview Stage – In the interview stage you will need to understand the proper approach for interviewing, the basic techniques you should use during an interview, and how to conduct yourself in a group interview. You will also want to understand what type of questions you should ask in the interview, what mistakes people make, and how to successfully close the interview.
  • Follow-up Stage – During this stage you will want to conduct a follow-up mini-campaign that includes thanking the members of the search committee and addressing any issues or concerns they may have about you as a candidate. You will also want to have an organized method for keeping track of each job you’ve applied for and the status of each of these searches.

These five stages are the major elements of the job search process. To land a job, you need to know, and be able to perform, each of the strategies and techniques that are within these five stages. To assist you in your job search, the book “Getting Hired in College Sports” is available as a resource. It identifies the techniques and strategies that are the best practices for all aspects of the job search process and it includes step-by-step worksheets that help you prepare for each stage of the job search. By performing these best practices you will be able to effectively execute the job search process. Best of luck on your upcoming job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is a Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 10 books and e-books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book The Positive Leader at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.

 

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


To Get a Job in Sports, You Need to Gain Experience

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

This is the third in a series of four blogs on “The competition for jobs in the sports industry is stiff, therefore you need to prepare accordingly.” The first blog discussed the need for mentoring in order to advance your career and the second was on effective networking. In this article I am sharing the importance of gaining experience in order to secure your next job in the sports world.

Remember that the reason that I am writing on this topic is a result of an article that Bill King wrote in Street & Smith’s Sports Business Journal that shared that there are many more sports management graduates than there are job openings. Because of this factor, you will need to be very proactive in making your dreams come true about working in the sports industry. Now I’m not trying to scare you off, I’m trying to give you practical advice that will help you to be one of the people who becomes employed in sports and has a successful career.

In a recent article in Psychology Today, Katharine Brooks wrote that employers want proof of your job related skills. She shared that experience is imperative as employers are looking to hire job seekers.

Whether you’re a recent graduate from a sports management program, or looking to move up in the profession, experience is one of the main keys to getting the job. This need for experience was seen in a recent study by Millennial Branding, which showed that 91% of employers believe that “students should have between one and two internships before they graduate.” Of these employers, “87% of companies think that internships should last at least three months for students to gain enough experience.” But just because you’re completing an internship, don’t have false expectations that the organization you’re doing your internship with will hire you – most students aren’t hired on after their internship. Instead, focus on how you can gain experience, secure strong recommendations, and further your career.

And here’s one of the most disturbing elements of the study . . . for entry-level jobs, “42% of employers are turned off by how unprepared students are in interviews.” While I’m a bit shocked by this, I shouldn’t be. In my 25+ years working in college sports and 11 years as an athletic director, I’ve hired dozens (if not hundreds) of people and reviewed thousands of resumes. There are just too many people who don’t know the basic fundamentals of the job search process. You need to gain experience both within your chosen profession and on how to get a job.

The point I’m trying to make is that gaining experience is key to getting your next job. This experience might be securing a second internship. It might be volunteering your services to an organization where you’d like to work someday. Or it might be gaining greater knowledge and networking by attending conferences, conventions, or professional development activities. You either grow and gain experience, or you become one of those statistics from the Street and Smith article. There are just too many passionate people who want to succeed in this industry. You can too; you just need to have a plan and work hard to gain the appropriate experience and skills.

Good luck as you continue to grow and learn within the sports industry. Please let me know if I can help you in any way.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Seeking Advice From a Mentor is Just Plain Smart

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

In last week’s blog, The Competition For Jobs In The Sports Industry Is Stiff – Prepare Accordingly, I shared four strategies a person should use in order to get a job in the sports industry. Today, I am discussing the first of these four strategies, seeking out a mentor.

When I began my sports career in 1984 I began by seeking advice from one of the best athletic directors in all of college sports. Mike Lude was the Athletic Director at the University of Washington and I was working in Finance in downtown Seattle, having recently received my bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. I had a great passion for sports and wanted to combine my formal education with this passion. My father-in-law suggested that I contact the athletic director at Washington and pick his brain. So I called Mike Lude and two days later I was sitting in his office asking several well thought-out questions. Mr. Lude gave me about two hours of his time that day. And it was his insights, advice, and recommendations, that gave me the foundational beginnings for a 25+ year career as a men’s basketball coach and Division I athletic director.

Throughout my career I stayed in touch with Mr. Lude and kept him updated on my progress. This type of mentorship is common, and has at least three main objectives – it provides you with the knowledge necessary to put you on the right career path, it also speeds up your career path, and finally it helps you to begin your networking. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to your career to elicit help and advice from someone you knows the correct career path and what mistakes to side step.

I’m not by far the only person who has used the guidance, advice, and motivation of someone within the profession. Take Jennifer Cohen for example. She is the current athletic director at the University of Washington. As youngster she sought the advice from the University of Washington football coach, Don James. Cohen was interested in becoming a football coach and Don James encouraged her to follow her passion for sports. You can see an interview with Cohen here, where she discusses the impact Coach James had on her life.

Working in sports is a great adventure. Whether you coach or are an administrator like Jennifer Cohen, you should follow your passion for sports and pursue a career in the sports world. But the competition for jobs in the sports world is keen. Don’t settle for trying to advance your career by yourself. Seek out and accept help from others. In other words talk to professionals and ask for their help and advice. Be a sponge and soak up the knowledge of others – the knowledge of the profession and the knowledge of how to get a job. If you want it bad enough, you can get the job of your dreams. Best of luck as you pursue your sports career!

 

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


The Competition For Jobs In The Sports Industry Is Stiff, Prepare Accordingly

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Competition for jobs in the sports industry is stiff, therefore you need to prepare accordingly. In a recent article by Bill King, published in the Street & Smith’s Sports Business Journal, he shared that there are roughly 24,000 undergraduate students and another 6,000 graduate students who are studying Sports Management within the United States. When these students graduate, they join approximately 8,000 students who graduated the previous year and are still looking for jobs. I share these statistics not to scare you, but to share the realities of the job market within the sports industry.

There is good news however. You can use a four-prong strategic approach that will give you a leg up on your competition. In other words, this strategy will give you, or your students, an advantage in the sports job market. This four-prong strategy will help you to become employable so you are able to beat out your competition. Each of the four individual prongs will provide you with a best practices strategy. And by utilizing all four strategies, you are almost assured a job. These four prongs include:

  • Seeking Out a Mentor
  • Beginning To Network
  • Gaining Experience
  • Gaining The Correct Job Search Skills and Strategies

Over the course of the next month or so, I will write my blog so that I address each of these prongs. But in the meantime, you should consider researching the skills and strategies that you need in order to have a successful job search within the sports industry. One of the best reference tools for gaining these skills and strategies is the book Getting Hired in College Sports. This book is being used in many of the sports management programs throughout the country, and it has helped hundreds of people to get a job in the sports world. Whether you decide to use this reference book or not, you need to understand and begin to practice the proper job search skills and strategies. Please let me know if I can help you in your job search

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Get Organized For Your Upcoming Job Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Recently I was visiting with a colleague and he shared a story about a time when he had a horrible interview. He wasn’t prepared for the interview and it just didn’t go well. Getting a job in the sports industry takes great preparation and organization. To help you with your organization, I have created a worksheet I call an Interview Preparation Form. It is a worksheet that’s designed to help you prepare for your job interview.

The Interview Preparation Form is a “cheat sheet” you can use to outline your answers to possible interview questions. It also outlines your personal sales pitch, provides bullet points to the stories you want to share when answering questions, provides a list of questions you want to ask the search committee, and it provides an organized method for effectively closing the interview. The Interview Preparation Form consists of the following five sections:

Section OneYour answers to potential interview questions. In this section you will list the questions you believe might be asked in an interview and then provide your corresponding answers.

Section TwoYour personal sales pitch. Your Personal Sales Pitch is the foundation for selling yourself during the interview. Your pitch should include three sections – a summary of your resume; your skills, abilities and traits; and your current situation. Depending on the question you are asked, you can use the pitch in its entirety or just one of the three sections.

Section ThreeOutline five stories you can share with the search committee. People like to hear stories. This section helps you prepare for sharing examples of your experiences through the use of stories.

Section FourQuestions you should ask. You need to be prepared to ask questions that will help you to better understand the job, the organization, the strengths and needs of the organization, and what the search committee is looking for in their new hire. This information will be used during the follow-up stage.

Section FiveClosing the interview. This section is an organized method for concluding the interview. It allows you to sell yourself to the search committee and it lets them know that you are interested in the job.

Once you have written your Interview Preparation Form, you will want to type it out in a Word document and practice answering these questions so they flow easily during the interview. In fact, when interviewing over the telephone, you might want to spread your cheat sheet out on a desk or table so you can glance down and remind yourself of the answer to a particular question. But don’t read directly from your form. The interviewers can tell if you’re reading a script. Instead, just refer to the bullet points of your stories, to the answers of potential interview questions, and to the questions you want to ask the committee. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to practice answering questions and reciting your personal sales pitch. This practice will allow you to come across fluid and confident in your communications.

I hope this information is helpful. You can read more about the Interview Preparation Form and the entire job search process in my book Getting Hired in College Sports. Remember that it is critical that you are properly prepared for your job search, because ultimately, the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Still Looking for a Job in the Sports Industry?

Get Yourself Unstuck With This Strategy

 

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Are you still looking for a job within the sports world? Whether you’re trying to break into the industry, or move up, the sports field is competitive and you need to be at your best. If you’re struggling to get a job, you need to analyze where you’re getting stuck in the process, and adjust what you’re doing.

There are five stages to the job search process. These include:

  1. Assessment Stage
  2. Preparation Stage
  3. Connection Stage
  4. Interviewing Stage
  5. Follow-up Stage

Which stage or stages are you struggling with? You need to identify where you’re struggling and then educate yourself as to the best practices in career development. The problem for many people is that they believe they already know all of the best strategies and techniques. But the savvy person will analyze where they are struggling and then learn all they can about overcoming their deficiencies.

For example, if you don’t know the exact type of job you want, then you’ll need to begin at the assessment stage. You will also begin at the assessment stage if you can’t succinctly communicate your strengths, weaknesses, skills, or abilities. However, if you know what type of job you want and you’re qualified for this type of position, and you also know your strengths, skills and abilities, but you still can’t get an interview, then you need to place your focus in both the preparation stage and connection stage. These stages will help you to prepare your marketing materials and how to conduct an effective job search campaign. Finally, if you are getting interviews but can’t land the job, you will then need to place the bulk of your focus on the interviewing stage and the follow-up stage. These stages will help you to become a great interviewer.

The key to getting your next job in the sports industry is for you to get to know the basic fundamental skills of each stage of the job search process and be able to effectively perform these skills. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Three Qualities Employers Look For When Hiring in The Sports Industry

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

This past summer I led I let a group of graduate students at Idaho State University in a class entitled Athletics in the West. It’s a weeklong field trip where we tour various athletic facilities and interview athletic professionals both at the college level and professional level so that the students can get a feel for the industry. This was my first year of teaching this class.

In years past the class went from Idaho through Wyoming and Colorado, and back home. They stopped at various Division I athletic departments, Division II athletic departments, and professional sport organizations. This summer I decided that the class would head a different direction. We decided to explore the differences between various organizations in Idaho and Washington. We began by traveling from Pocatello over to Boise and up to Lewiston Idaho. There we began our adventure by touring the athletic facilities at Lewis-Clark State College. They have a visionary athletic director who presented some of the best athletic facilities in the NAIA. Later that day we toured the athletic facilities at the University of Idaho. Their associate athletic director was so gracious in providing his time, vision, and insights into the profession. This first day allowed us to compare the differences in facilities, staffing levels, vision, and strategies between a high-level NAIA school compared with a Non-Power 5 athletic department. The difference in facilities and staffing levels was significant. The Division I institution was bigger in everything – staffing, facilities, vision, and strategy. The employees were similar though – very nice, friendly, and professional. During our visits at both schools, one of our students asked each athletic professional what they look for when hiring people.

The next day we visited the athletic department at Washington State University. The senior associate athletic director provided a tremendous opportunity for our class. He gave us a thorough tour of their new and renovated facilities, their branding strategies, and provided insights into the industry that can only be gained by visiting with a seasoned college athletic administrator. After a three-hour tour of the athletic facilities and picking-the brain of one of the most respected athletic administrators in the country, our campus tour moved across campus and concluded with a two-hour visit of the recreation department. Once again, at both stops, the student asked the same question about what they look for when hiring people.

This theme continued as the next day we visited with a first class football coach at the University of Washington. We toured their facilities, and visited on the vision and culture that makes Huskies football outstanding. Our trip concluded with the class touring CenturyLink Field (Seahawks and Sounders) and Safeco Field (Mariners). With each stop came the same question – What do you look for when hiring employees.

While the answer to this question varied slightly from each athletic professional, there was a definite pattern that crossed over to every person at every sports organization. What these athletic professionals are looking for when hiring employees is loyalty, work ethic, and positive attitude. Our students thought the answers would be more in alignment with having a certain type of college degree, a certain number of years of experience, or even a certain type of skill. These latter qualities are either part of the minimum qualifications for the job, and therefore every applicant has them, or they can be gained on the job. The bottom line is – employers want positive people who work hard and are loyal. If a future employer were to call your references, would they say that you are an upbeat positive person, that you work hard, and that you are loyal? Just some food for thought.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Where To Begin Your Job Search – Answer These Four Questions

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you are beginning to look for a new job. Where do you start? How do you begin your job search? There are five stages to the job search process. These include the assessment stage, the preparation stage, the connection stage, the interview stage, and the follow-up stage. Each of these stages is so very different. To have a successful job search campaign, you will need to be able to effectively execute the fundamental skills for each of these different stages.

Everybody is at a different place in his or her job search. Some are just beginning their work life and they need to complete various self-assessments so they truly understand their personal strengths, skills, and abilities. Others need to understand how to prepare for a job search by understanding how to effectively write a cover letter and resume. Still others need to brush up on their interview skills and/or their follow-up skills.

To help you determine where to begin in your job search, and learn the appropriate job search skills, you should answer the following four questions to see which one best applies to you. By determining which of the four questions is closest to your situation, you can determine which stage of the job search process is the best place for you to focus your energies. I highly recommend that you do not skip any of the stages of the job search process, because the better you know yourself, and the better you know the job search strategies, the more likely you are to land the job of your dreams. But, by identifying where you should begin your job search, you can place the majority of your focus and energies in that particular stage of the job search process.

Questions

  1. I feel as if I am lost. I am not sure what type of job or career I want.
  2. I think I know what type of job I want, but is there a type of job that I am better suited for?
  3. I know what type of position is right for me, but I cannot get an interview.
  4. I am getting interviews but I cannot land the job.

Where Should You Begin?

If you answered #1 or #2, you need to initially focus on the testing and assessments stage. Once you have completed this stage and have a better understanding of your career path, you will begin to focus on the preparation stage. If you answered #3, your greatest focus needs to be on preparing for your search. Finally, if you answered #4, you need to review the information regarding interviewing skills and your follow-up strategies. You also need to look to expand into different types of markets within the sports industry.

By knowing which stage of the job search process you are in, you will be able to place the majority of your focus and energies in this area so you can learn and get better. You will be able to learn the fundamental skills and strategies of each stage of the job search process so you can effectively execute the various skills and strategies of the job search process. Good luck with your job search!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


The First Step To Getting A Job In Sports Is To Assess Your Strengths, Skills and Abilities

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

In my book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, I’ve outlined two phases to the job search process. The first phase, entitled the Discovery Phase, helps you identify your strengths, weaknesses, skills and abilities. It also helps you plan your career and identify whom to contact for your upcoming job search. The second phase, entitled the Search Phase, is where you prepare your marketing materials, apply for jobs, prepare for your interview, conduct the interview, and follow-up after the interview. The first phase helps you to be successful in the second phase. By knowing your strengths, skills and abilities you are better able to sell yourself in your resume, cover letters, during an interview, and in following up after your interview. In other words, the very first step you should take in order to conduct a successful job search is to know yourself; to know your strengths, skills and abilities.

To get to know your strengths, skills and abilities, you will want to conduct several self-assessments. Self-assessments will help you to:

  • Identify your occupational values – what you like and dislike in a job
  • Identify your top five skills and abilities
  • Identify your personal traits
  • Create a roadmap to achieving your dream job
  • Figure out which organizations to contact for your upcoming job search

Many people jump over the assessment stage of the job search process and right into writing their cover letters and resume. This is the wrong strategy. Typically you only have one opportunity to apply for the right job at the right institution. If you don’t write a great cover letter and sales pitch, you might miss this opportunity. You need to prepare yourself by understanding what you like and dislike in a job, what your top five skills are, and understand what personal traits you possess. You can access this information by conducting self-assessment questionnaires and worksheets. They will take you less than a day to complete.

There are several self-assessments that you can find on-line. However, the self-assessment worksheets I list in the book are specifically related to the sports industry. Regardless of which assessments you use, make sure you get to know yourself. Get to know the strengths, skills and abilities you bring to a sports organization. Then sell yourself in your cover letter, your sales pitch, in answering interview questions, and in following up after the interview.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University