Questions Not To Ask In An Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Sometimes it’s not what you do or say in life, sometimes it’s what you don’t do or say. Take Jim for example. Jim has been searching for a job for a couple of months since graduating from college. He has struggled in his first couple of interviews so he decided to do some research into the proper techniques a person should use during an interview.

As he was reading through a book on career development, he ran across a section that discussed the types of questions a person should not ask during a job interview. The author reasoned that the goal of the interview is to build positive relationships during your meetings and that you need to show the hiring manager that you have done your research. By asking the following types of questions, it is clear to the search committee that you have not adequately prepared for the interview.

  • Avoid asking questions that are answered in the institution’s general information or on their website (e.g. number of sports offered, the record of last years team, etc). These types of questions will let the interviewer know that you did not do your homework. But by all means ask questions if some information is not clear to you.
  • Avoid asking about the salary or benefits in the first interview. This is a major mistake. Quite often, the salary can be found on the Internet or in a published article. The interviewer may choose to bring this information up, but you should not initiate the topic. By asking about the salary too early in the process, it will give the impression that you are more concerned with what is in it for you. In fact, the interviewer may give you the salary range up front to see if you are still interested in the position. If the salary is a bit low, do not acknowledge this; rather allow the process to take its course. If you are their choice, you can attempt to negotiate a better salary. However, do not think that you can get the hiring manager to increase the salary by 25-50 percent. This is a waste of time for both you and the hiring institution.
  • Avoid asking any personal questions or questions that will put the hiring manager on the defensive. These may include, but are not limited to: their age, race, religion, health, or marital status.
  • Avoid asking questions that have already been answered in the interview session. If some of the questions on your list have already been answered during the current interview, do not repeat them. However, feel free to ask the same question to a different group of people within the organization, especially if you are not comfortable with the answer you received.

These are some of the basic interviewing techniques that Jim uncovered in his research. Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


To Get a Job in Sports, You Need to Gain Experience

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

This is the third in a series of four blogs on “The competition for jobs in the sports industry is stiff, therefore you need to prepare accordingly.” The first blog discussed the need for mentoring in order to advance your career and the second was on effective networking. In this article I am sharing the importance of gaining experience in order to secure your next job in the sports world.

Remember that the reason that I am writing on this topic is a result of an article that Bill King wrote in Street & Smith’s Sports Business Journal that shared that there are many more sports management graduates than there are job openings. Because of this factor, you will need to be very proactive in making your dreams come true about working in the sports industry. Now I’m not trying to scare you off, I’m trying to give you practical advice that will help you to be one of the people who becomes employed in sports and has a successful career.

In a recent article in Psychology Today, Katharine Brooks wrote that employers want proof of your job related skills. She shared that experience is imperative as employers are looking to hire job seekers.

Whether you’re a recent graduate from a sports management program, or looking to move up in the profession, experience is one of the main keys to getting the job. This need for experience was seen in a recent study by Millennial Branding, which showed that 91% of employers believe that “students should have between one and two internships before they graduate.” Of these employers, “87% of companies think that internships should last at least three months for students to gain enough experience.” But just because you’re completing an internship, don’t have false expectations that the organization you’re doing your internship with will hire you – most students aren’t hired on after their internship. Instead, focus on how you can gain experience, secure strong recommendations, and further your career.

And here’s one of the most disturbing elements of the study . . . for entry-level jobs, “42% of employers are turned off by how unprepared students are in interviews.” While I’m a bit shocked by this, I shouldn’t be. In my 25+ years working in college sports and 11 years as an athletic director, I’ve hired dozens (if not hundreds) of people and reviewed thousands of resumes. There are just too many people who don’t know the basic fundamentals of the job search process. You need to gain experience both within your chosen profession and on how to get a job.

The point I’m trying to make is that gaining experience is key to getting your next job. This experience might be securing a second internship. It might be volunteering your services to an organization where you’d like to work someday. Or it might be gaining greater knowledge and networking by attending conferences, conventions, or professional development activities. You either grow and gain experience, or you become one of those statistics from the Street and Smith article. There are just too many passionate people who want to succeed in this industry. You can too; you just need to have a plan and work hard to gain the appropriate experience and skills.

Good luck as you continue to grow and learn within the sports industry. Please let me know if I can help you in any way.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Seeking Advice From a Mentor is Just Plain Smart

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

In last week’s blog, The Competition For Jobs In The Sports Industry Is Stiff – Prepare Accordingly, I shared four strategies a person should use in order to get a job in the sports industry. Today, I am discussing the first of these four strategies, seeking out a mentor.

When I began my sports career in 1984 I began by seeking advice from one of the best athletic directors in all of college sports. Mike Lude was the Athletic Director at the University of Washington and I was working in Finance in downtown Seattle, having recently received my bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. I had a great passion for sports and wanted to combine my formal education with this passion. My father-in-law suggested that I contact the athletic director at Washington and pick his brain. So I called Mike Lude and two days later I was sitting in his office asking several well thought-out questions. Mr. Lude gave me about two hours of his time that day. And it was his insights, advice, and recommendations, that gave me the foundational beginnings for a 25+ year career as a men’s basketball coach and Division I athletic director.

Throughout my career I stayed in touch with Mr. Lude and kept him updated on my progress. This type of mentorship is common, and has at least three main objectives – it provides you with the knowledge necessary to put you on the right career path, it also speeds up your career path, and finally it helps you to begin your networking. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to your career to elicit help and advice from someone you knows the correct career path and what mistakes to side step.

I’m not by far the only person who has used the guidance, advice, and motivation of someone within the profession. Take Jennifer Cohen for example. She is the current athletic director at the University of Washington. As youngster she sought the advice from the University of Washington football coach, Don James. Cohen was interested in becoming a football coach and Don James encouraged her to follow her passion for sports. You can see an interview with Cohen here, where she discusses the impact Coach James had on her life.

Working in sports is a great adventure. Whether you coach or are an administrator like Jennifer Cohen, you should follow your passion for sports and pursue a career in the sports world. But the competition for jobs in the sports world is keen. Don’t settle for trying to advance your career by yourself. Seek out and accept help from others. In other words talk to professionals and ask for their help and advice. Be a sponge and soak up the knowledge of others – the knowledge of the profession and the knowledge of how to get a job. If you want it bad enough, you can get the job of your dreams. Best of luck as you pursue your sports career!

 

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Positioning Yourself For Your Next Job

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Periodically, I receive telephone calls or e-mails from people who are seeking advice about their job search. That was the case last March when “David” contacted me about the possibility of applying for a head soccer coaching position. David was an assistant soccer coach at a low-major Division I program on the East Coast and he was thinking about applying for a head coaching position at a mid-major Division I soccer program on the West Coast.

David knew that I was a former Division I athletic director and he wondered how a Division I AD would view his application. He wanted me to be honest with him, so I was. I asked if he knew anyone at the institution – he didn’t. I asked if he knew anyone, who knew anyone at the institution – he didn’t. I asked these questions because the best way to get a job (assuming that you’re qualified) is to have connections with people at the institution. If you don’t have these types of connections, you then need to have the skills and experiences that will make you a very attractive and qualified candidate.

Since David didn’t have any connections within the institution, he now became a bit of a long shot for landing the job. To complicate matters even more, David was trying to make the leap from being an assistant coach at a lower level to a head coach at a higher level. This is a difficult move to make.

So what type of candidate would an athletic director recruit to a position such as this? Typically, a head coaching position will be filled by either (a) someone who is an assistant coach at an equal or higher level of competition, or (b) someone who is a head coach at an equal or next lower level of competition. Of course, there are exceptions to these rules. But these strategies are pretty common hiring practices in both coaching and athletic administration.

For example, if a mid-major university such as Colorado State was looking to hire a coach, they would likely hire an assistant from a major program such as the Big 12 or Pac 12, or hire a head coach from an equal (or slightly lower) level of competition such as the Missouri Valley Conference or the Big Sky Conference. To further this example, take a look at the hiring of the last two Head Men’s Basketball Coaches at Colorado State. In 2007, Tim Miles was hired after leading North Dakota State to success as an independent (he was a head coach from the same Division but at a lower level of competition). Miles had success at CSU and was then hired by Nebraska for their head coaching position in 2012 (he was a head coach from the same Division but CSU is in a lower level conference than Nebraska). Colorado State responded to losing Miles by hiring Larry Eustachy from Southern Mississippi (he was a head coach from the same Division and Southern Mississippi is at the same level of competition).

These two hires are pretty typical for every sport at every level. Athletic Department’s either hire a head coach from an equal or slightly lower level of competition, or hire an assistant from a higher level of competition. The bottom line is, that in order to being hired you need to be qualified for the position, it helps to know the people doing the hiring, and you need to position yourself for the job. David’s desire to make the leap from a lower level assistant to a mid level head coach was unrealistic. And after our conversation, David reasoned that if the mid level is where he wants to be a head coach, he would either need to become a head coach at a lower-level Division I program or as an assistant at a higher-level Division I program. He now understands the importance of positioning.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.
“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University

 

 


The Resume, Your Marketing Tool

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Quite often when a job opens up within a college athletic department there will be more than 50 people who apply for the position.  In fact, sometimes there could be more than 100 or even 200 applicants.  With so many applicants, how do you get your resume noticed?

In the typical search, many of the applicants don’t meet the basic requirements of the position.  Still others will submit resumes that are hard to read.  Therefore, you need to be able to present a resume that is professional, clearly shows how you meet the qualifications of the position, and is easy to read.  In fact, your resume needs to sell you within 10-20 seconds.  This is the length of time that most search committee members will take to initially view a resume.  If the resume catches their attention, the members of the committee will spend more time reviewing your credentials.

Many people will tell you that a resume should be one to two pages in length at a maximum.  I somewhat disagree. A resume needs to be long enough to show your experiences and accomplishments, but short enough that a potential employer will read it.  As a person advances in their career, their resume will grow in length.  My personal resume is four pages long.  When I first graduated from college my resume was one or two pages, but as new experiences and accomplishments came along the resume grew.  I feel strongly that if I were to limit my resume to two pages, I would severely hinder my opportunity to sell myself to a perspective employer.

Your resume needs to effectively use fonts, bullets, bold, and underlining to get the search committee to see what you want them to see.  People naturally view written pages from the top of the page and down the left margin.  Therefore, these areas need to have your most important information.  Writing lengthy sentences and paragraphs are a sure-fire way to lose the interest of the reader, and they will usually stop reading your resume.  In other words, your resume needs to be viewed as a marketing tool that promotes you as a job applicant.  This marketing tool needs to be pleasing to view, and needs to easily show how you meet the qualifications of the position.  If you cannot show how you meet the qualifications of the job within 10-20 seconds, you won’t be a finalist for the position.  In essence, your resume is an important marketing tool used for showing your qualifications.  Your resume, along with the cover letter, form the basic marketing tools for effectively selling yourself to the search committee.  If either tool is not constructed properly, you most likely will not receive the opportunity to interview.  The key is that you know the basic fundamental skills that are associated with each stage of the job search process and that you effectively perform each of these skills.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”


-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 


The Importance of a Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

I was having dinner a while back with a friend who is the president of a professional sports team. One of his major duties is to hire the administrative and sales staff. Since I had been an athletic director at the Division I level, and had written a book about the proper techniques people should use during the job search process, I wanted to compare notes between hiring at the major college level and at the professional sports level.

I was truly shocked when he shared with me that many of the resumes that he receives are submitted without a cover letter, and of the cover letters that he does receive, many are addressed with a generic salutation such as – “To Whom it May Concern” or “Dear Hiring Manager”. I really shouldn’t have been too surprised because I had received my share of those types of letters during the several hundred job searches I conducted.

As I was shaking my head in disbelief I asked him how he handles the applications that come in with the non-existent letter or with the generic written salutation. Quickly, without even a bit of hesitation, or a blink of an eye, he said that they automatically go into the rejection pile. This, too, is how I handled these types of applications at the collegiate level.

An application without a cover letter is almost always rejected. An application with a generic salutation such as “To Whom it May Concern” has a better chance than no letter, but still you’re fighting an uphill battle. The purpose of the cover letter is to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications, why you’d be a good fit for the job, and it allows you to sell yourself. If you don’t properly sell yourself in your cover letter, you are missing a huge opportunity and you’re putting yourself behind your competition. So next time you apply for a job, take the time to find out who to address the letter to and then sell yourself. Show the search committee how you’re qualified and why you’re a good fit. Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job search process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“Your book and your jobs blog are great! I used the book to prepare for a job that was listed on your blog and got it!! Now we are doing well and employed, thanks for all you do Dr. G.”


-Sara Jones
Aquatics Manager
University of Washington


Strategies For Becoming a College Coach

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Travis was both excited and nervous as he sat in the lobby waiting for his appointment with Coach Smith. He was excited because in a couple of minutes he would be visiting with one of the top coaches in college sports. Travis had scheduled an informational interview so he could find out more about the coaching profession in hopes that he, too, could someday be a successful coach.

As Coach Smith entered the lobby he greeted Travis with a big smile and a firm handshake. From there they made their way back to his office and Travis was in awe as he saw all of the trophies, championship photos and awards Coach Smith had lining his office walls. The hospitable coach graciously said, “have a seat Travis, I’m glad we’re able to get together.” Travis was nervous as he asked his first round of informational questions.

The conversation truly gave Travis some insight into the profession, and he now knew he definitely wanted to be a college coach. Nearly a half-hour into their conversation Coach Smith shared a book with Travis entitled “Getting Hired in College Sports.” It was a book on career development and outlined the formula that many coaches and administrators have used when they were breaking into the industry. In short, the book suggested that there are three broad areas a person should focus on as they develop a strategy for becoming a coach.

  • Learn all that you can about your sport
  • Begin to network within the industry
  • Gain experience

Learn All That You Can

Beginning your career in college coaching is an exciting time. You will need to prepare yourself to eventually become an expert in your sport. Research shows that if a person wants to become an expert in a particular activity, they will need approximately 10,000 hours of experience. This experience will include learning all you can about your subject; such as reading all you can about your subject, listening to audio programs about your craft, watching videos by expert coaches, and attending coaching clinics. You will want to learn the proper skills and techniques for teaching and coaching your sport, and you will want to learn the strategies and schemes for effective performance. These are some of the suggestions that are outlined in the book “Execute for Success.”

Begin To Network

Networking is one of the most important elements for getting hired in any industry. This is because people want to hire employees who they know and trust. Networking is building friendships and relationships with others within your profession. These friends/colleagues should help one another with advice, strategy, and emotional support. Quite often, people will get to know each other through working in the same organization, by working sports camps and clinics, through attending games or tournaments, and through attending regional or national conventions.

Gain Experience

Keep in mind that having a successful career in any profession is a journey and not a race. Building a career takes time if done right. Be patient and work your way up. Prove yourself as a passionate and professional coach. The following are some of the types of jobs that people are able to secure in order to start their coaching career and gain experience – graduate assistant, volunteer assistant, director of operations, small college assistant, student assistant, student manager, high school coach, or junior high coach. There is not one single right way to begin your coaching career. The key is to work hard, learn all you can about your sport, network, and be patient as you work your way up within the profession.

It didn’t Travis long to break into college coaching. He used the advice Coach Smith provided, and the tips and strategies he uncovered in the job search book. Travis first became a student assistant, worked several summer camps and clinics, and he finally became a graduate assistant. Travis has a bright future as he is following his passion for coaching.
 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”
-Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University


The Job Search Continuum

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

The experiences you have are key to securing the job you want. The more aligned your experiences are with the job you’re applying for the better your chances are for getting the job.  I liken this to a continuum where at one end you don’t have any experience and on the other end you have the exact experiences that the position requires.

This would be like an athletic director at a Division I institution applying for an athletic directors position at another Division I institution, exact job experience.  But even with this exact job experience, this doesn’t mean the person will get the job.

This is because there are other factors that comprise your overall experiences within the job search continuum.  Exact job experience is important but so is the type of education you have, your skills and abilities, and being the right fit for the institution.  All of these experiences are important factors that move you up or down the continuum.

Somewhere along this continuum lies your experience.  The closer you get to the exact qualifications of the position you want, the more likely you are to get the job.

So what is your career goal?  What is your current job?   What steps do you need to take to get from your current situation to where you want to be?  The answers to these questions will help you to identify how to move up the continuum toward gaining the experiences you need for the job you want.  More specifically, once you have identified the job you want, answer the following three questions.

1.   What educational training will you need in order to attain the job you want? (e.g. a master’s degree in Sports Management)

2.   What experiences are necessary in order to attain the job you want? (e.g. coaching experience, marketing experience)

3.   What skills are necessary for you to attain the job you want? (e.g. budgeting, public speaking, management skills)

Once you have identified the skills, experiences, and educational training that you need, you will want to create a personal training and development program that will help you to gain these experiences.  In turn, this personal training and development plan will help you to move up the job search continuum and get you closer to the job you really want.  Continuing to learn, and continuing to improve, is necessary as you strive to reach your career goals.

Ultimately, the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job search process.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition  at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com  or his new book Execute for Success at www.Execute4Success.com.

The Importance of Having a Quality Resume

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

 

Recently, an athletic department was hiring for a position in their marketing department.  Robert, the hiring manager, was responsible for the initial review of the resumes and when asked, Robert shared the process he goes through when reviewing resumes.

 

He began by sharing that he believes that the purpose of a resume is to show the hiring manager that you meet the qualifications for the position.  Your resume should be easy to read and it should sell you.  For this marketing position, Robert estimated that they received between 150 – 200 resumes.  So I inquired about how a hiring manager goes through each resume and trims the list to a workable number.

 

What I found out is that many hiring managers organize resumes into three categories – applicants who the search committee definitely wants to review further (the “yes” pile), applicants who the search committee might want to review further (the “maybe” pile), and applicants who do not make the cut (the “no” pile).  So how does a person land in the “yes” pile of resumes?  To answer this, you need to understand how the hiring manager thinks. 

 

When a resume is submitted for a job, it needs to be easy to read and show that the applicant is qualified for the position.  This process will take about 15 seconds for the hiring manager to scan the resume and determine if the applicant meets the minimum qualifications (education and experience).  If an applicant meets the minimum qualifications, their resume is placed in the “yes” pile.  If a quick scan can’t determine the applicant’s qualifications their resume is placed in either the “maybe” pile or the “no” pile.  And if the applicant does not meet the minimum qualifications, or the resume is so poorly written, the resume goes into the “no” pile.

 

Once this initial review is completed, the search committee might go through the “maybe” pile to see if there are any qualified candidates that should be moved into the “yes” pile, but they might not.  Then the committee gets to work and starts a thorough review of the applicants in the “yes” pile.  If your resume isn’t clear or doesn’t sell you, you might find yourself no longer in the running for the position.  For these reasons, you need to construct a resume using the following guidelines. 

  1. Your resume needs to show your education, experiences, and achievements in a quick 15-second scan.
  2. It needs to be formatted in a way that effectively uses fonts, bullets, and bolding to show the committee your qualifications.
  3. It needs to have quite a bit of white space, and you should use bullets and short statements instead of sentences and paragraphs.  Don’t make the committee search to find your qualifications and achievements, make sure your qualifications and achievements are clear and easy to see.
  4. Present your most important information along the left margin because people read from the top of the page down the left margin.
  5. Use a legible and conservative font and font size such as 12-point Times.  Headings can be 14-point, but don’t make the mistake of having a font that is too large or too small. The exception to this is your name at the top of the page.  Your name should be in a larger font size such as 20 or 22 point.
  6. Have your margins between 1 – 1.25 inches.  This helps in the white space and the eye-pleasing format.

Your resume is so important in the job search process.  You typically have one shot at communicating your qualifications and achievements.  If your resume doesn’t do a good job of communicating your qualifications and selling your achievements, you’ve blown it.  Take the time to create a quality resume.  You’ll be glad you did.

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com or his new book, Execute for Success, at www.execute4success.com.

 

Understanding Which Stage Of the Job Search Process You’re In

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Tanya and Todd are both searching for a job in the sports world.  Tanya is a soccer coach who is looking to advance in her career and Todd recently graduated with a master’s degree in Sports Management.  While Tanya is very focused on her career, Todd isn’t sure what type of job he wants to pursue.

Tanya knows that she wants to advance in the coaching profession but is having a difficult time getting an interview.  Todd on the other hand is confused as to what type of job or career he wants.  They both seek the assistance of a career coach to help them with their search process.

The career coach shares that there are five stages to the job search process:

1.    Assessment Stage

2.    Preparation Stage

3.    Connection Stage

4.    Interviewing Stage

5.    Follow-up Stage

In Tanya’s situation, the career coach suggests that since she knows what type of job she is interested in, the majority of her energies should be focused on the preparation and connection stages.  The preparation stage would have her review her cover letter, resume, references, and sales pitch to make sure they are formatted correctly and written correctly.  She needs to make sure that her sales tools are excellent, and that they are effectively selling her.  The career coach continued by explaining that most jobs are secured through networking, and that the connection stage would help her to be active and effective in networking within the profession.

In Todd’s situation, the career coach suggested that he begin his job search process in the assessment stage.  He needs to understand the various types of jobs that exist in the sports industry, and to understand which type of job best fits his personality, skills, and lifestyle.  The career coach went on to share that during the assessment stage, Todd will also discover his strengths, weaknesses, skills, and abilities.  These will help him as he identifies what type of career he wants to pursue, and in developing his promotional materials.

The career coach also recommended that both Tanya and Todd spend the majority of their attention, at this point, within their specific job search stage, but that they familiarize themselves with the other stages as well.  This is so they will be prepared to interview when the time comes, and to properly follow-up after an interview.

So where should you begin?  If you are lost and not knowing what type of job you want – you’ll start with the assessment stage.  If you know what type of job you want but aren’t getting interviews – you’ll need to assess your situation and focus on both the preparation and connection stages.  And if you are getting interviews but not the job offers – you’ll want to focus on both the interviewing and follow-up stages.  The key is that you know the basic fundamental skills of each stage of the job search process and that you effectively perform these skills.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com or his new book, Execute for Success, at www.execute4success.com.