Three Strategies For Writing A Great Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Writing a great cover letter is both an art and a science. It’s an art in that good writing takes time and practice, and it’s a science in that you need to know the proper elements for writing a quality letter. When applying for a job, you will want to craft a cover letter that will sell you to the search committee with the hope that they are intrigued with you and your application. This in turn will prompt them to spend more time reviewing your resume.

However, too many people place their complete focus on writing a great resume without paying enough attention on their cover letter. Don’t get me wrong, having a top-notch resume is extremely important, but so is having a quality cover letter. One without the other is like having a team without a leader, you typically won’t be as successful as you would like.

In order for your cover letter to be effective, you will want to be strategic in how you write the letter. There are three strategies you should follow in order to write your cover letter. These strategies include (a) understanding the purpose of your cover letter, (b) writing the letter so it is specific to the organization and the position, and (c) making sure you follow the IBS format for creating a strategic cover letter (introduction, body and summary).

Purpose

Your cover letter and resume are the marketing materials for your job search. They should be used to sell you to the search committee. In particular, the purpose of your cover letter is to sell you and prompt the search committee to take a closer look at your resume. A quality cover letter can catapult you forward in the job search process. Conversely, a poorly written cover letter can eliminate you from consideration.

Specific

Your cover letter needs to be personalized to the person who is in charge of hiring the position. This could be the hiring manager or the search committee. Do not address your letter to “To Whom it May Concern.” If the job announcement doesn’t specifically identify whom the hiring person is, or the chair of the search committee, you will need to do your homework so you can find out who the best person is for you to address your cover letter. This could include addressing your application materials to the athletic director (or the person who the position reports to), the HR manager, or even the search committee – but never “to whom it may concern.”

Your cover letter should be written in a way that introduces you and your resume to the hiring manager or the search committee. It should tell them who you are, how you are qualified for the position, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position. More specifically, you will want to make sure you address how you meet each of the qualifications listed in the job description.

Format

Your cover letter should not be any longer than 1 1/3 pages of 12-point font. Preferably, you should try to limit your cover letter to one page if at all possible. But don’t try to squeeze your letter on to one page by using 10-point font. This font is too small and most people won’t continue to read your letter. If they stop reading your materials, you have just been eliminated from the candidate pool.

Make sure you follow the IBS format for writing a cover letter. This includes having a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five. The first paragraph is considered an introduction and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for and what actions you are taking to apply for the job.

Following the introduction is the body of the letter. The body will range between one and three paragraphs in length. It is designed to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications for the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you possess; and what accomplishments you have achieved in similar positions. The final paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it should explain why you are a good fit for the position.

A well-crafted cover letter will help you to sell yourself as a well-qualified applicant. If properly prepared, the cover letter will prompt the search committee to want to take a closer look at your resume and will get you one step closer to an interview. Therefore, in order to move your candidacy from the application process to the interview stage, it is extremely important that you have a properly formatted resume and a strategically written cover letter. These are essential elements that are necessary for receiving an interview.

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
I just finished your book.  One of the things that helped me the most was the interview questions. Some of the examples of the questions (as well as some ways to answer those questions) were perfect.
-Jarred Neff
Sports Management Student
Pace University

 

 


Three Strategies For Writing A Great Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Writing a great cover letter is both an art and a science. It’s an art in that good writing takes time and practice, and it’s a science in that you need to know the proper elements for writing a quality letter. When applying for a job, you will want to craft a cover letter that will sell you to the search committee with the hope that they are intrigued with you and your application. This in turn will prompt them to spend more time reviewing your resume.

However, too many people place their complete focus on writing a great resume without paying enough attention on their cover letter. Don’t get me wrong, having a top-notch resume is extremely important, but so is having a quality cover letter. One without the other is like having a team without a leader, you typically won’t be as successful as you would like.

In order for your cover letter to be effective, you will want to be strategic in how you write the letter.  There are three strategies you should follow in order to write your cover letter. These strategies include (a) understanding the purpose of your cover letter, (b) writing the letter so it is specific to the organization and the position, and (c) making sure you follow the IBS format for creating a strategic cover letter (introduction, body and summary).

Purpose

Your cover letter and resume are the marketing materials for your job search.  They should be used to sell you to the search committee. In particular, the purpose of your cover letter is to sell you and prompt the search committee to take a closer look at your resume.  A quality cover letter can catapult you forward in the job search process.  Conversely, a poorly written cover letter can eliminate you from consideration.

Specific

Your cover letter needs to be personalized to the person who is in charge of hiring the position. This could be the hiring manager or the search committee.  Do not address your letter to “To Whom it May Concern.”  If the job announcement doesn’t specifically identify whom the hiring person is, or the chair of the search committee, you will need to do your homework so you can find out who the best person is for you to address your cover letter.  This could include addressing your application materials to the athletic director (or the person who the position reports to), the HR manager, or even the search committee – but never “to whom it may concern.”

Your cover letter should be written in a way that introduces you and your resume to the hiring manager or the search committee.  It should tell them who you are, how you are qualified for the position, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position.  More specifically, you will want to make sure you address how you meet each of the qualifications listed in the job description.

Format

Your cover letter should not be any longer than 1 1/3 pages of 12-point font.  Preferably, you should try to limit your cover letter to one page if at all possible.  But don’t try to squeeze your letter on to one page by using 10-point font.  This font is too small and most people won’t continue to read your letter.  If they stop reading your materials, you have just been eliminated from the candidate pool.

Make sure you follow the IBS format for writing a cover letter.  This includes having a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five.  The first paragraph is considered an introduction and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for and what actions you are taking to apply for the job.

Following the introduction is the body of the letter.  The body will range between one and three paragraphs in length.  It is designed to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications for the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you possess; and what accomplishments you have achieved in similar positions.  The final paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it should explain why you are a good fit for the position.

A well-crafted cover letter will help you to sell yourself as a well-qualified applicant.  If properly prepared, the cover letter will prompt the search committee to want to take a closer look at your resume and will get you one step closer to an interview.  Therefore, in order to move your candidacy from the application process to the interview stage, it is extremely important that you have a properly formatted resume and a strategically written cover letter.  These are essential elements that are necessary for receiving an interview.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Sell Yourself in Your Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Recently, I wrote about writing a great resume. It is one of the most important marketing tools you can create to help sell you for a job opening. Just as important, however, is your cover letter.

The purpose of a cover letter is to sell you, provide insight into you as a person, and show why you are a good fit for the position. A good cover letter will prompt the search committee to take a closer look at you and your resume.  In fact, a quality cover letter can catapult you forward in the job search process, whereas,  a poorly written cover letter can eliminate you from consideration.

Your cover letter needs to be personalized to the person who is in charge of hiring the position. This could be the hiring manager or the search committee.  Do not address your letter to “To Whom it May Concern.”  If the job announcement doesn’t specifically identify whom the hiring person is, or the chair of the search committee, you will need to do your homework so you can find out who the best person is for you to address your cover letter.  This could include addressing your application materials to the athletic director (or the person who the position reports to), the HR manager, or even the search committee – but never “to whom it may concern.

Your cover letter should be written in a way that introduces you and your resume to the hiring manager or the search committee.  It should tell them who you are, how you are qualified for the position, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position.  More specifically, you will want to make sure you address how you meet each of the qualifications listed in the job description.

Your cover letter should not be any longer than 1 1/3 pages of 12-point font.  Preferably, you should try to limit your cover letter to one page if at all possible.  But don’t try to squeeze your letter on to one page by using 10-point font.  This font is too small and most people won’t continue to read your letter.  If they stop reading your materials, you have just been eliminated from the candidate pool.

Make sure you follow the IBS format for writing a cover letter (Introduction, Body, and Summary).  This includes having a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five.  The first paragraph is considered an introduction and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for and what actions you are taking to apply for the job.

Following the introduction is the body of the letter.  The body will range between one and three paragraphs in length.  It is designed to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications for the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you possess; and what accomplishments you have achieved in similar positions.  The final paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it should explain why you are a good fit for the position.

A well-crafted cover letter will help you to sell yourself as a well-qualified applicant.  If properly prepared, the cover letter will prompt the search committee to want to take a closer look at your resume and will get you one step closer to an interview.  Therefore, in order to move your candidacy from the application process to the interview stage, it is extremely important that you have a properly formatted resume and a strategically written cover letter.  These are essential elements that are necessary for receiving an interview.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Six Words or Phrases Not To Use in Your Resume or Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Writing a quality resume and cover letter isn’t an easy task. These promotional tools take time, great thought, and many revisions in order to create a document that can really sell you. In this week’s blog, I’m outlining a thought for you to consider as you analyze the effectiveness of your resume and cover letter. My writings for this blog are an adaptation from a recent article written by Catherine Conlan from Monster.com where she identified eight words and phrases that should not be used in your resume. I have adapted this and outlined six terms that you will want to carefully consider not using as you polish up your resume and cover letter. These six terms are:

Results-Oriented – The general thought is that the term “results-oriented” is not very descriptive. Instead, you should provide specifics about what you accomplished. It is best if you describe the project, share the actions you took, and discuss the results or outcomes.

High Technical Aptitude – Again, this term isn’t very specific and appears that you’re trying to hide your lack of experience. If you truly have a high technical aptitude, discuss a specific program you’ve worked with, explain what you did, and share what you accomplished (or what the results were). In a compliance office this could include working with CAi or LSDBi.

Assisted – Most people who work in the sports world work in a team setting. In this role they are constantly assisting others as they strive to achieve the outcome of the project. Stating that you assisted someone isn’t very impressive. Instead, state what you did. Provide examples of your experiences. For example, as an intern you may have assisted in game management, but be more descriptive. Instead, let the hiring manager know that you have experience in game management, ticket sales, and in-game promotions.

Use of Trendy Adjectives – Don’t try to impress the search committee by using terms such as “cutting-edge” or “ground-breaking”. Instead, clearly describe what you’ve done or what you’ve accomplished.

Self-Starter – The term self-starter is a pretty generic term and working in the sports world requires working long hours and having the initiative to complete projects. Be more descriptive and share with the committee what projects you have worked on and what the results were. You will also want to share with the employer what strengthens and skills you would bring to their organization.

Detail-Oriented – All employees should pay attention to details. Instead of using “detail-oriented” to describe yourself, try sharing some projects you’ve worked on that requires a real attention to detail. For example, if you work in a compliance office, it requires that you are detail-oriented, that’s a given. How much more impressive would it be to tell the search committee that you have experience working with NCAA eligibility reports, hardship waivers, squad lists, etc. You get the idea.

The six terms listed above are similar in that they aren’t very descriptive and they lack detail. People quite often use generic terms, such as these, to describe themselves when they don’t know their strengths, skills, abilities and accomplishments. As you write your resume and cover letter, make sure you understand your attributes and are able to clearly communicate them.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


How To Write A Quality Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Most people tend to place a considerable amount of attention on producing a quality resume, but what about your cover letter? A resume is a relatively static document that only changes when you receive more education or gain additional experiences. The cover letter, however, needs to be adjusted with every new job application.

This constant need to update your cover letter makes this a dynamic document that must be changed, tweaked, adjusted and personalized for every new job application you submit.  In order for your cover letter to be effective, you will want to be strategic in how you write the letter.  In particular, you will want to understand the purpose of your cover letter, write the letter so it is specific to the organization and the position, and make sure you follow the IBS format for creating a strategic cover letter (introduction, body and summary).

Purpose

Your cover letter and resume are the marketing materials for your job search.  They should be used to sell you to the search committee. In particular, the purpose of your cover letter is to sell you and prompt the search committee to take a closer look at your resume.  A quality cover letter can catapult you forward in the job search process.  Conversely, a poorly written cover letter can eliminate you from consideration.

Specific

Your cover letter needs to be personalized to the person who is in charge of hiring the position. This could be the hiring manager or the search committee.  Do not address your letter to “To Whom it May Concern.”  If the job announcement doesn’t specifically identify whom the hiring person is, or the chair of the search committee, you will need to do your homework so you can find out who the best person is for you to address your cover letter.  This could include addressing your application materials to the athletic director (or the person who the position reports to), the HR manager, or even the search committee – but never “to whom it may concern.”

Your cover letter should be written in a way that introduces you and your resume to the hiring manager or the search committee.  It should tell them who you are, how you are qualified for the position, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position.  More specifically, you will want to make sure you address how you meet each of the qualifications listed in the job description.

Format

Your cover letter should not be any longer than 1 1/3 pages of 12-point font.  Preferably, you should try to limit your cover letter to one page if at all possible.  But don’t try to squeeze your letter on to one page by using 10-point font.  This font is too small and most people won’t continue to read your letter.  If they stop reading your materials, you have just been eliminated from the candidate pool.

Make sure you follow the IBS format for writing a cover letter.  This includes having a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five.  The first paragraph is considered an introduction and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for and what actions you are taking to apply for the job.

Following the introduction is the body of the letter.  The body will range between one and three paragraphs in length.  It is designed to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications for the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you possess; and what accomplishments you have achieved in similar positions.  The final paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it should explain why you are a good fit for the position.

A well-crafted cover letter will help you to sell yourself as a well-qualified applicant.  If properly prepared, the cover letter will prompt the search committee to want to take a closer look at your resume and will get you one step closer to an interview.  Therefore, in order to move your candidacy from the application process to the interview stage, it is extremely important that you have a properly formatted resume and a strategically written cover letter.  These are essential elements that are necessary for receiving an interview.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

Helping You Get A Job In Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Strategy for Writing a Quality Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Most people tend to place a considerable amount of attention on producing a quality resume, but what about your cover letter? A resume is a relatively static document that only changes when you receive more education or gain additional experiences. The cover letter, however, needs to be adjusted with every new job application.

This constant need to update your cover letter makes this a dynamic document that must be changed, tweaked, adjusted and personalized for every new job application you submit.  In order for your cover letter to be effective, you will want to be strategic in how you write the letter.  In particular, you will want to understand the purpose of your cover letter, write the letter so it is specific to the organization and the position, and make sure you follow the IBS format for creating a strategic cover letter (introduction, body and summary).

Purpose

Your cover letter and resume are the marketing materials for your job search.  They should be used to sell you to the search committee. In particular, the purpose of your cover letter is to sell you and prompt the search committee to take a closer look at your resume.  A quality cover letter can catapult you forward in the job search process.  Conversely, a poorly written cover letter can eliminate you from consideration.

Specific

Your cover letter needs to be personalized to the person who is in charge of hiring the position. This could be the hiring manager or the search committee.  Do not address your letter to “To Whom it May Concern.”  If the job announcement doesn’t specifically identify whom the hiring person is, or the chair of the search committee, you will need to do your homework so you can find out who the best person is for you to address your cover letter.  This could include addressing your application materials to the athletic director (or the person who the position reports to), the HR manager, or even the search committee – but never “to whom it may concern.”

Your cover letter should be written in a way that introduces you and your resume to the hiring manager or the search committee.  It should tell them who you are, how you are qualified for the position, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position.  More specifically, you will want to make sure you address how you meet each of the qualifications listed in the job description.

Format 

Your cover letter should not be any longer than 1 1/3 pages of 12-point font.  Preferably, you should try to limit your cover letter to one page if at all possible.  But don’t try to squeeze your letter on to one page by using 10-point font.  This font is too small and most people won’t continue to read your letter.  If they stop reading your materials, you have just been eliminated from the candidate pool.

Make sure you follow the IBS format for writing a cover letter.  This includes having a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five.  The first paragraph is considered an introduction and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for and what actions you are taking to apply for the job.

Following the introduction is the body of the letter.  The body will range between one and three paragraphs in length.  It is designed to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications for the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you possess; and what accomplishments you have achieved in similar positions.  The final paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it should explain why you are a good fit for the position.

A well-crafted cover letter will help you to sell yourself as a well-qualified applicant.  If properly prepared, the cover letter will prompt the search committee to want to take a closer look at your resume and will get you one step closer to an interview.  Therefore, in order to move your candidacy from the application process to the interview stage, it is extremely important that you have a properly formatted resume and a strategically written cover letter.  These are essential elements that are necessary for receiving an interview.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

The #1 Careers Book For The Sports Profession

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University

 

 


Four Promotional Tools Needed For Your Job Search

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Brian was beginning to look for another job. He asked his friend Joyce, who works in the career center at a university, if she would review his resume and cover letter. She agreed to analyze his documents and told Brian she would provide him with honest and professional feedback.

Brian worked on his resume and cover letter late into the night and dropped them by Joyce’s office the next morning. Later that day Joyce contacted Brian and stated “I like how your resume is simple, clear and easy to read.”  “These are the key elements to writing an effective resume.”  “You know, most employers will only spend between 15-20 seconds reviewing a resume.” Joyce is correct. Your resume must convey to the hiring manager or the search committee, within 15-20 seconds, how you meet the qualifications for the position.

Joyce went on to discuss Brian’s cover letter.  She shared that the cover letter, like your resume, should be viewed as a marketing tool.  Its purpose is to sell you, provide insight into you as a person, and show how you are a good fit for the position.  They continued to discuss the proper formatting of the cover letter and how the letter needs to be individually tailored to each position you apply for.

She then asked Brian if he had a list of references and a personal sales pitch. Your reference list usually includes the name, title, and contact information of people who will provide positive and outstanding comments about you to the hiring manager. Your references should be able to really sell you. Many people think they have to list their current boss (or former boss) as a reference. If you and your boss don’t see eye-to-eye on things, don’t list them. You can’t afford to have a negative reference. List only three people (unless they request more), and preferably people who can influence the hiring decision.

Your personal sales pitch should include three sections that can be used individually or collectively to answer interview questions. These three sections include (a) your strengths, traits, skills, and abilities, (b) a summary of your resume, and (c) your current situation.

Joyce wrapped up their conversation by reiterating to Brian that there are four main items that you should use to promote yourself: (a) your resume, (b) your cover letter, (c) having the proper references, and (d) having a sales pitch that is organized and really sells you. Having these four marketing tools are essential for getting an interview, and being successful in your interview.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

Prepare Yourself For a Job in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

The Resume, Your Marketing Tool

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Quite often when a job opens up within a college athletic department there will be more than 50 people who apply for the position.  In fact, sometimes there could be more than 100 or even 200 applicants.  With so many applicants, how do you get your resume noticed?

In the typical search, many of the applicants don’t meet the basic requirements of the position.  Still others will submit resumes that are hard to read.  Therefore, you need to be able to present a resume that is professional, clearly shows how you meet the qualifications of the position, and is easy to read.  In fact, your resume needs to sell you within 10-20 seconds.  This is the length of time that most search committee members will take to initially view a resume.  If the resume catches their attention, the members of the committee will spend more time reviewing your credentials.

Many people will tell you that a resume should be one to two pages in length at a maximum.  I somewhat disagree. A resume needs to be long enough to show your experiences and accomplishments, but short enough that a potential employer will read it.  As a person advances in their career, their resume will grow in length.  My personal resume is four pages long.  When I first graduated from college my resume was one or two pages, but as new experiences and accomplishments came along the resume grew.  I feel strongly that if I were to limit my resume to two pages, I would severely hinder my opportunity to sell myself to a perspective employer.

Your resume needs to effectively use fonts, bullets, bold, and underlining to get the search committee to see what you want them to see.  People naturally view written pages from the top of the page and down the left margin.  Therefore, these areas need to have your most important information.  Writing lengthy sentences and paragraphs are a sure-fire way to lose the interest of the reader, and they will usually stop reading your resume.  In other words, your resume needs to be viewed as a marketing tool that promotes you as a job applicant.  This marketing tool needs to be pleasing to view, and needs to easily show how you meet the qualifications of the position.  If you cannot show how you meet the qualifications of the job within 10-20 seconds, you won’t be a finalist for the position.  In essence, your resume is an important marketing tool used for showing your qualifications.  Your resume, along with the cover letter, form the basic marketing tools for effectively selling yourself to the search committee.  If either tool is not constructed properly, you most likely will not receive the opportunity to interview.  The key is that you know the basic fundamental skills that are associated with each stage of the job search process and that you effectively perform each of these skills.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


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#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”


-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 


The Importance of a Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

I was having dinner a while back with a friend who is the president of a professional sports team. One of his major duties is to hire the administrative and sales staff. Since I had been an athletic director at the Division I level, and had written a book about the proper techniques people should use during the job search process, I wanted to compare notes between hiring at the major college level and at the professional sports level.

I was truly shocked when he shared with me that many of the resumes that he receives are submitted without a cover letter, and of the cover letters that he does receive, many are addressed with a generic salutation such as – “To Whom it May Concern” or “Dear Hiring Manager”. I really shouldn’t have been too surprised because I had received my share of those types of letters during the several hundred job searches I conducted.

As I was shaking my head in disbelief I asked him how he handles the applications that come in with the non-existent letter or with the generic written salutation. Quickly, without even a bit of hesitation, or a blink of an eye, he said that they automatically go into the rejection pile. This, too, is how I handled these types of applications at the collegiate level.

An application without a cover letter is almost always rejected. An application with a generic salutation such as “To Whom it May Concern” has a better chance than no letter, but still you’re fighting an uphill battle. The purpose of the cover letter is to show the search committee how you meet the qualifications, why you’d be a good fit for the job, and it allows you to sell yourself. If you don’t properly sell yourself in your cover letter, you are missing a huge opportunity and you’re putting yourself behind your competition. So next time you apply for a job, take the time to find out who to address the letter to and then sell yourself. Show the search committee how you’re qualified and why you’re a good fit. Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job search process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

#1 Sports Job Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.

“Your book and your jobs blog are great! I used the book to prepare for a job that was listed on your blog and got it!! Now we are doing well and employed, thanks for all you do Dr. G.”


-Sara Jones
Aquatics Manager
University of Washington


Six Elements That Form a Quality Cover Letter

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

A quality cover letter is a key marketing tool that helps to sell you in the application process.  Each cover letter you write will need to be specific to the organization where you are applying for a job. The purpose of the cover letter is to introduce you and your resume to the search committee (or hiring manager).  It should tell them who you are, how you meet the qualifications of the job, any applicable accomplishments you have, and why you are a good fit for the position.

The format of the cover letter should consist of the following six elements:

  • Heading – The format of the cover letter will begin with you typing your address at least one inch down from the top of the page.  This is followed by the current date.  Space four times and type the name of the person whom you are sending the letter to (include their title: Dr., Ms., Mr.), the title of their position, the name of the employer, and the address of the employer.  This is the heading of your letter and it will be followed by the salutation.
  • Salutation – The salutation is the proper introduction to the letter.  It should include “Dear” and then the person’s title and their last name.  Always attempt to address the letter to the appropriate person and not “To Whom it May Concern”.   Also, always address the person with their proper title (Mr., Ms., Dr.) and their last name. 
  • Opening Paragraph – The letter itself will be a minimum of three paragraphs and a maximum of five.  The first paragraph is an introduction, and it tells the search committee which job you are applying for (e.g. “I am applying for the position of . . .”), and what actions you are taking to make application (e.g. “Enclosed are my resume and a list of references”). 
  • Body – The body of the letter follows the introduction and it needs to sell you. The body will range between one and three paragraphs.  It is designed to show how you meet the qualifications of the position (education and experience); what strengths, abilities, and traits you would bring to the organization; and what accomplishments you have achieved in a similar type position.  The body is followed by the closing paragraph.
  • Closing Paragraph – The closing paragraph is a summary of your interest in the job and it explains why you are a good fit for the position.  This is followed by the complimentary close.
  • The Complimentary Close – After the closing paragraph, double space and type your complimentary close (e.g. Sincerely) followed by a comma.  Space four times and type your name.  The space between the close and your name is where you are to sign the letter.  Always remember to sign the letter with a black or navy ballpoint pen.  Too many times people are eliminated because they forget to sign the letter.  If you are sending your materials via e-mail, type your name in the signature space, change the font to a handwriting style (e.g. Handwriting – Dakota), and increase the font size to make it look as if you signed your name.

A well-crafted cover letter is necessary in selling you as an applicant.  It will prompt the reader to want to take a closer look at you and your resume.  However, a poorly written letter can eliminate you from consideration.  If you are going to take the time to apply for a job, do it right by writing an outstanding cover letter that really sells you.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job search process.  This includes writing a quality cover letter that really sells you.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInsitute.com or his newest book Execute for Success at www.Execute4Success.com.

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Be Prepared When The Right Job Opens

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Be prepared when the right job opens up.  Give yourself the book that provides you with the top job search skills and techniques.  It’s a competitive industry, so be prepared!

Click Here To PurchaseOnly $23.95

.

“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators. A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”
-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University