Preparing For Your Upcoming Skype Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Todd was both excited and nervous as he hung up the telephone.  Four weeks ago he submitted his resume and cover letter for a marketing position at a Mid-level Division I institution in New York. Today, Todd was asked to interview with the search committee via a Skype interview.

He was excited because this is a job that he really wants, but Todd is also nervous because his initial interview is via Skype. Todd has never used Skype before and he knows that if he is going to make a great first impression, he needs to be prepared. The first thing he did was to contact a friend who regularly uses Skype and asked for some help and advice.

As Todd was preparing for his interview and learning more about the Skype process, he concluded that in order to have an effective Skype interview, he needed to concern himself with four broad areas:

  • Computer related issues
  • The physical setting
  • Practice and preparation
  • The interview

Todd knows that in order to have a quality interview, he needs to have the proper computer equipment and software.  This includes having a relatively new computer (within the last five years) with a webcam, a microphone, and speakers.  The interviewee would also need access to an Internet connection and have a Skype account.

Todd found that when setting the location and atmosphere for the interview, you should select a place where you won’t be interrupted or distracted.  Quite often, a home office is best because it has a professional look and feel.  If added lighting is needed, a person will want to set up a table lamp about four feet behind the computer.  And to make sure that the setting looks professional, both the desk and surrounding background must be clutter free.

Once the computer equipment and software are coordinated, and the interview setting has been established, you will now need to practice using Skype and all of the computer settings.  Prior to the actual interview, you will want to practice calling and receiving Skype calls, and practice answering interview questions.  To make sure you look good on the video, you will want to sit back a little further from the computer and make sure that your face and shoulders appear in the video screen.

During the actual interview, a person will want to have their cell phone close by and ready in case the Internet connection is lost.  Make sure you have the cell number of the interviewers in case this happens.  But also make sure that your cell phone is turned off during the interview. You don’t want your phone ringing during this session. Other items you will want to consider during the interview session is to have your computer plugged into an electrical outlet so the battery doesn’t die, dress in a professional manner, keep other computer programs closed so the computer doesn’t slow down, and as you interact with the search committee look into the camera and not at the computer screen.

As you prepare the room for your interview, you might want to display your resume, sales pitch, and the answers to interview questions behind the computer so you can glance and refer to this information without looking awkward to those who are interviewing you (similar to a television news anchor using a teleprompter).  In the end, Todd was very well prepared for his Skype interview, he performed well, and was invited for an on-campus interview.  

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book The Positive Leader at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Dual Purposes Of The Job Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Meagan was preparing for an upcoming job interview as an athletics marketing director at an NCAA Division I school in the Midwest. One of her colleagues suggested that to better prepare herself for the interview she should get the book Getting Hired in College Sports. It is the #1 sports careers book in the country and has helped thousands of people get jobs. As she read the book, one of the sections in the book discussed the dual purposes of the job interview. The book shared that very rarely does a person get offered a job during the interview itself and therefore the real purpose of the interview is two-fold: (a) To sell yourself, and (b) To gather information.

Selling Yourself

We all know that the main purpose of an interview is to sell yourself to the members of the search committee. You do this by being prepared, scripting out and practicing the answers to potential interview questions, having a quality sales pitch, dressing appropriately, knowing your strengths and skills, being up-beat and positive in your communication, being yourself, and successfully closing the interview. You will want to sell the members of the search committee that you are the expert who can solve their problems. You will also want to build a positive relationship with each of these committee members.

Gathering Information

Since the job offer rarely comes during the interview itself, a second purpose of the interview is to gather information about the organization. You will then use this information during the follow-up stage of the job search process. This information should be used in an attempt to influence the hiring decision in your favor. In other words, during the interview you will both sell yourself to members of the search committee, and you will gather information that can be used later in the process to convince the committee members that you are the best person for the job.

As you interview and gather information, you will want to ask probing questions. You should take the approach as seeing yourself as a consultant where you are analyzing the organization and their situation. You will want to gather facts, understand what the committee members are looking for in a candidate, understand what concerns they have regarding your candidacy, and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the organization.

With the information you’ve uncovered, you will now want to send follow-up correspondence to everyone you met during your interview. This correspondence is used to thank the people for their time and also to sell yourself to them. Let them know that you want the job, what skills and abilities you bring to the position, and you will want to be very strategic as you really convince them that you’re the right person for the position. Each letter or note that you send should be individually tailored. This is where your information gathering really pays dividends.

Meagan followed these strategies, interviewed well, followed up with personalized hand-written notes, and in the end, she was offered the job. These strategies came directly from the book Getting Hired in College Sports. It is the most complete and comprehensive job search book in all of sports. To get a copy of this book, go to our website at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com. Best of luck in your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his latest book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Getting Organized For Your Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Last week I was visiting with a colleague and he shared a story about a time when he had a horrible interview. He wasn’t prepared for the interview and it just didn’t go well. Getting a job in the sports industry takes great preparation and organization. To help you with your organization, I have created a worksheet I call an Interview Preparation Form. It is a worksheet that’s designed to help you prepare for your job interview.

The Interview Preparation Form is a “cheat sheet” you can use to outline your answers to possible interview questions. It also outlines your personal sales pitch, provides bullet points to the stories you want to share when answering questions, provides a list of questions you want to ask the search committee, and it provides an organized method for effectively closing the interview. The Interview Preparation Form consists of the following five sections:

Section One – Your answers to potential interview questions. In this section you will list the questions you believe might be asked in an interview and then provide your corresponding answers.

Section Two – Your personal sales pitch. Your Personal Sales Pitch is the foundation for selling yourself during the interview. Your pitch should include three sections – a summary of your resume; your skills, abilities and traits; and your current situation. Depending on the question you are asked, you can use the pitch in its entirety or just one of the three sections.

Section Three – Outline five stories you can share with the search committee.   People like to hear stories. This section helps you prepare for sharing examples of your experiences through the use of stories.

Section Four – Questions you should ask. You need to be prepared to ask questions that will help you to better understand the job, the organization, the strengths and needs of the organization, and what the search committee is looking for in their new hire. This information will be used during the follow-up stage.

Section Five – Closing the interview. This section is an organized method for concluding the interview. It allows you to sell yourself to the search committee and it lets them know that you are interested in the job.

Once you have written your Interview Preparation Form, you will want to type it out in a Word document and practice answering these questions so they flow easily during the interview. In fact, when interviewing over the telephone, you might want to spread your cheat sheet out on a desk or table so you can glance down and remind yourself of the answer to a particular question. But don’t read directly from your form. The interviewers can tell if you’re reading a script. Instead, just refer to the bullet points of your stories, to the answers of potential interview questions, and to the questions you want to ask the committee. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to practice answering questions and reciting your personal sales pitch. This practice will allow you to come across fluid and confident in your communications.

I hope this information is helpful. You can read more about the Interview Preparation Form and the entire job search process in my book Getting Hired in College Sports. Remember that it is critical that you are properly prepared for your job search, because ultimately, the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Given a Choice, When Should You Interview?

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

I was asked an interesting question the other day. A young man was interviewing for an assistant athletic directors position and he was given a couple of different days he could choose for his on-campus interview. He asked me if there was an advantage in the order of when a candidate should interview. My response was quick and clear – yes, it can matter when you interview.

Of course, your qualifications, experience, communication skills and preparation are vitally important for determining who is offered the job. But so is having an advantage because of the lasting impression you make, the information you have, and your follow-up strategies. The following are some thoughts on this subject.

Lasting Impression – Quite a bit of research in social psychology has been conducted as to who will get the job based on the order of their interview. Some research suggests that the first person has the advantage because they get to make the first impression (primary effect), while other studies have shown that the last person to interview has the advantage because they get to leave the last impression (recency effect). Based on this information, if all interviewees were thought of as equal in regard to how they interviewed, you will want to select either the first or last slot for your interview. However, if a superior candidate is interviewing in a middle slot, they will probably still get the job offer.

Information – In theory, all candidates have the same information, so why should order of when you interview make a difference from an information perspective? Because the people who interview last might be able to gather additional information that was brought up in previous interview sessions. Let’s say that the second person to interview was asked a question that somewhat stumped them. A problem surfaced that is facing the department and the committee asked the candidate how they would handle it. This might have caught the candidate off guard but they did their best to answer a difficult question. If this is a high profiled job, a local news reporter might write an article about the candidate and mention the candidate’s thoughts on how they would handle the problem. You now have an advantage because you have time to prepare for how you will answer the question. It doesn’t have to be a news reporter. It could be someone on the “inside” sharing the information with you prior to your meeting with the search committee. Regardless, information is powerful, and if you can uncover information and properly prepare, you have an advantage that the earlier candidates did not have.

Follow-up – Following up after the interview is so important. This is what separates candidates when they appear fairly equal in their interview. It might be a simple thank you note to each search committee member, or more likely a real strategy in how you will influence the decision of the members of the search committee. But one of the key understandings to getting the job is to not panic because the hiring decision isn’t being made as quickly as you want. But this can be a good thing. People tend to get anxious when the search process takes time. In fact, some people get so anxious that they drop out of the running. They end up withdrawing their name from consideration, and your chances of getting hired have just improved. Since many searches are spread over a week or two, the final interviewee has an advantage over those who have already interviewed and are waiting on pins and needles for a decision.

So does it really matter which order you interview? Not if you’re clearly the best candidate. But if all the candidates are relatively equal, your odds are better if you interview last. You have the advantage of leaving the last impression, obtaining more information, and not suffering from anxiety related to the time it’s taking to hire a candidate. Best of luck with your job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Interviewing: It’s More Than Just Showing Up And Selling Yourself

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Interviewing for a job is much more than just showing up and selling yourself. There is a considerable amount of strategy you should use in preparing for your job interview. Below are seven strategies you will want to consider as you prepare for your interview.

Gather Information – Prior to an interview you will want to research and gather information about the organization. You will want to research the people, the position, the organization, and the industry. Having the correct information is powerful and you will want to continue to gather information during your interview. Like a consultant, you will want to try to uncover the strengths, weaknesses, and any potential issues the organization is facing. Once you have identified the issues, develop a plan that shows the committee how you can help solve their problems. Your plan should be shared during the interview as one possible solution. Then continue to ask questions and gather more information. This information will then be used during the follow-up phase in an attempt to influence the hiring decision of the search committee.

Organize Your Findings – Once you have begun to gather information, you will want to organize your findings. It would be helpful if you created a form that lists who the hiring manager is and a little bit about their background.  You will also want to list the names of the members on the search committee, what their backgrounds are, and if you can make any connections with any of them (i.e. similar friends, from the same area, etc.). Finally, list pertinent information you have uncovered about the position and the institution. This could include a list of the strengths of the organization, the weaknesses of the organization, and any major issues facing the department/organization.

When To Interview – If at all possible, try to be the last candidate to interview. This gives you an advantage over the other candidates because you will have the opportunity to leave the final impression on the committee. In addition, the longer a search is drawn out, the more anxious the candidates tend to get. Quite often, this leads the other candidates to withdrawing from the search.

Visit The Interview Site – Once the interview is scheduled, if you are not completely familiar with the exact location of the interview, you should plan to drive by the location the day before your meeting. Finding the exact location would also pertain to interviewing in a hotel. Make sure to walk by the room where you will be interviewing ahead of time. The last thing you want to do is be late to the interview because you couldn’t find the interview room. Be prepared and know where you are going – this will help to reduce your anxiety.

Practice Your Answers – A large part of interviewing is being able to effectively communicate the answers to the questions that are asked by the search committee. This takes practice. You would not expect an actor in a play to be smooth with their lines if they did not practice, this holds true for an interview. You need to know which questions will most likely be asked, and you need to practice your answers to these questions. Knowing your personal sales pitch should also assist you with many of the questions you are asked.

Know The Job Description – A part of knowing which questions will be asked in an interview has to do with what the people within the institution want from the position. Review the job description and know how you meet the qualifications and the duties of the position.

Arriving At The Interview – First impressions are everything. If you are meeting a search committee member prior to the interview, such as being picked up at an airport, view this first meeting as the first stage of the interview. Dress appropriately for the situation and be prepared to make a good first impression.

Interviewing is more than just showing up and selling yourself. Be prepared and be organized.  For more information on the basic fundamental skills needed for the job search process, check out my book Getting Hired in College Sports at www.SportsCareersInsitute.com

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Answering Interview Questions Through Storytelling

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

The big day has finally arrived. You are nervous, yet excited for today’s job interview. You keep telling yourself that the interview is your time to shine – and it is! One of the new techniques that you have prepared for is the use of telling stories and providing detailed examples as a way to answer some of the interview questions.

During your interview you will be asked various questions, some of which can be answered by telling stories or sharing examples. These include questions that begin with the phrase “tell me about a time when . . .” or “give me an example of . . .” These types of questions can really help you to sell yourself and to connect with the members of the search committee. And the good news is people like to hear stories.

So how do you tell a good story? One of the best and easiest ways to tell a story is to follow the following guidelines:

  1. Identify Your Story – You will want to identify which of your accomplishments, achievements or examples you want to communicate through the use of a story.
  2. Organize An Outline For Your Story – Follow the PAR format for storytelling – Problem (or situation), Action, and Result.
  3. Write Out The Story (30 seconds to 2 minutes in length) – Once you have identified a particular situation where you have excelled, and you have also outlined the event, you will then begin to write out the story. As you’re writing, you will describe the problem or situation that you faced, continue by describing the actions you took, and conclude by describing the results or outcomes.
  4. Read Your Story Out Loud – Once you have written the story, read it out load and make sure it is written exactly how you want it to be expressed.
  5. Practice Reciting Your Story – As with all of your answers to potential interview questions, you will want to practice reciting your stories so they flow naturally and are communicated with confidence.
  6. Organize Your Stories – Once the story is complete, you will want to type your story, and keep it organized along with your answers to all potential interview questions.

In telling a story, be sure that you communicate all three parts of the story – describe the problem, communicate the actions that you took, and share the results. Since this is a job interview, make sure your stories have a positive message, and that you communicate your stories with energy, enthusiasm and confidence. Best of luck on your upcoming interviews!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

Helping You Get A Job In Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Preparing For Your Upcoming Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Being organized and prepared for your upcoming interview is one of the keys for getting the job.  As you prepare for your interview you need to gather information such as who is the hiring manager, who is on the search committee, and who can influence the hiring process. This type of information is important so you can be strategic in your approach. But this is just one of five recommendations for preparing for your upcoming interview.

Interviewing is both an art and a science.  It is a science in that there are strategies and techniques you can use that will give you an advantage in the job search process.  It is an art, however, in how you execute these strategies and techniques.  Below are five strategies that you need to properly execute that will help you to become prepared for your upcoming interview.

Gather Information Prior to the Interview – Be prepared as you go into your interview. Know who the hiring manager is, who is on the search committee, and what they want in their new hire. Also, know a little bit about the organization and the job itself. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the organization, and how can you solve their problems. What are the duties of the job, and why did the previous person leave the position. These are some of the items you will want to research before you go into your interview.

Prepare Your Answers to Interview Questions – A second suggestion is to be prepared in how you will answer the various interview questions. Know the type of questions that will most likely be asked during your interview. Write out your answers to these questions and practice reciting your responses. In addition, many interview questions can be answered using your Personal Sales Pitch. Think of yourself as an actor on a stage. Practice your lines so they easily flow when it is your turn to talk.

Gather Information During the Interview – During the interview you will want to ask questions and gather information. You will want to find out what the vision is for the future of the organization and uncover any problems the organization is facing. This information will help you so you can develop a plan to meet their vision or solve their problems. Finally, try to understand something that is unique about each search committee member. This could be how they view you and your fit for the position, any potential personal friends or colleagues you may share, or any type of information that can connect you with the committee member. This information will be used as you follow-up after your interview.

Understand the Basic Techniques of Interviewing – When the day of your interview arrives, you need to be ready and skilled with the proper techniques for conducting a successful interview. This includes knowing what to wear, how to interact with the search committee, knowing your body language, knowing what to bring with you to your interview, what questions to ask, and how to successfully close the interview.

Strategically Follow-up After the Interview – Following up with the people you met during your interview is one of the most important parts of the interview process. Many interviewees do not send follow-up correspondence to the people they have met. This is a big mistake because the follow-up stage provides you with an opportunity to influence the decision of the search committee members by thanking them for the interview, and convincing them that you are the right fit for the job. This could be reiterating your strengths with a search committee member who does not believe you are a good match for the institution. It could also allow you to share your plans in how you will lead the organization toward their vision, or how you will solve their problems. In other words, following up after the interview gives you a platform in which you can convince the search committee that you are the right person for the job

As with most endeavors in life, if you are not prepared you will not be as successful as you desire. Therefore, as you approach your upcoming interview, vow to be as prepared as you should be and follow the five key elements listed above. Ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job search process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

Helping You Get A Job In Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


How To Recover From a Botched Interview Answer

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

An interview is often quite similar to a theatrical play. While an actor has to know their lines within the play, you too need to know your lines during a job interview. The lines in an interview are your answers to interview questions. But what happens when you either forget your lines or you begin to answer the question incorrectly?

If your mind goes blank or you find yourself rambling in your answer, you should (a) catch yourself rambling or searching for an answer, (b) take a deep breath, (c) compose yourself, and (d) consider using your Personal Sales Pitch to answer the question. Many answers to interview questions can be answered by reciting your Personal Sales Pitch. Your sales pitch is composed of three sections – a summary of your resume, your strengths and abilities, and your current situation. These three sections are described in greater detail below.

A Summary of Your Resume – This is the first section of your Personal Sales Pitch and is a summary of your professional life, your education, your experiences, and accomplishments. It is used to answer questions such as “What is your experience working in this industry”, “What is your greatest work accomplishment”, or “What are your qualifications.”

Your Strengths, Skills and Abilities – This is the second section of your pitch. You will want to identify your five or six greatest strengthens, skills, abilities and/or traits and create a pitch that best describes you and your values. This section will be used to answer questions such as “What are your strengths” or “How would your colleagues describe you.”

Your Current Situation – Your third section of the Personal Sales Pitch should describe your current situation and how you would fit into their organization. It should be used to answer questions such as “What is your current job and why are your looking to leave this position.”

Depending upon the question being asked, approximately half of all questions can be answered by sharing your pitch in its entirety, or by reciting one of its three subsections. You would use the pitch in its entirety (all three sections combined) to answer a question such as “Tell me about yourself.”

Like an actor in a play, you need to practice your lines so your answers flow naturally and your communication is easily understood. But if something were to go wrong while you’re answering an interview question, take a deep breath, collect yourself and consider using your sales pitch as a back up. It’s a situation such as this that I strongly recommend that you write out the potential interview questions that you might be asked and then write out the corresponding answers to these questions. Once you have these questions and answers prepared you will want to practice, practice and practice reciting your answers. Good luck in your interview!

 

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

Helping You Get A Job In Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Preparing The Communication For Your Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Getting a job in college athletics takes preparation, networking, persistence, and organization. To help you with your organization, I have created an Interview Preparation Form that is a worksheet that’s designed to help you prepare for your job interview. The Interview Preparation Form is an organized “cheat sheet” that helps you with the organization of your communications so you can ace your interview.

The Interview Preparation Form is designed to provide you with a method of organizing your interviewing thoughts, answers, questions, and stories. It has you create an overview of the answers to the questions you’re most likely to be asked, it outlines your personal sales pitch, it provides bullet points to the stories you want to share when answering questions, it provides a list of questions you want to ask the search committee, and it provides an organized method for you to properly and effectively close the interview. The Interview Preparation Form consists of the following five sections:

Section One – Your answers to potential interview questions. In this section you will list the questions that you believe might be asked in an interview and then provide your corresponding answers. You will want to practice answering these questions prior to having your interview.

Section Two – Your personal sales pitch. Your Personal Sales Pitch is the foundation for selling yourself during the interview. Your pitch should include three sections – a summary of your resume; your skills, abilities and traits; and your current situation. Depending on the question you are asked, you can use the pitch in its entirety or just one of the three sections.

Section Three – Five stories you can share with the search committee.   People like to hear stories. This section helps you prepare for sharing examples of your experiences through the use of stories.

Section Four – Questions you should ask. You need to be prepared to ask questions that will help you to understand the organization and their needs. This information will be used during the follow-up stage.

Section Five – Closing the interview. This section is an organized method for concluding the interview. It allows you to leave the search committee with your strengths, and lets them know that you are interested in the position. It also provides you with information that you can use later in the interview process.

Once you have written your Interview Preparation Form, you will want to rehearse the answers to potential questions so they flow easily during the interview. In fact, when interviewing over the telephone, you might want to spread your cheat sheet on a desk or table so you can glance down and remind yourself of the answer to a particular question. But don’t read directly from your form. The interviewers can tell if you’re reading a script. Instead, just refer to the bullet points of your stories, to the answers of potential interview questions, and to the questions you want to ask the committee. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to practice answering questions and reciting your personal sales pitch. This practice will allow you to come across fluid and confident in you communications.

I hope this information is helpful to you. You can read more about the Interview Preparation Form and the entire job search process in my book Getting Hired in College Sports. Remember that it is critical that you are properly prepared for your job search, because ultimately, the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.

*******

Helping You Get A Job In Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


How To Effectively Approach Your Interview

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Reflect back upon your most recent professional interview. How was your interaction with the search committee or hiring manager? Did you take charge of the interview or did the search committee control the environment? When searching for a job, you need to know how to properly execute the job search process. This includes knowing how to properly approach the interview.

One of the major keys for properly executing the interview is to approach it with the mentality of “interviewing like a consultant.”  But what does a consultant do?  A consultant sells their expertise to an organization; and then gathers facts, identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the organization, and analyzes their problems. He or she then communicates these strengths, weaknesses, and problems to the appropriate people within the organization. They then follow this up by making recommendations for solving their problems.

This is your role during an interview. You need to be prepared to sell yourself, to provide a good impression, to ask quality questions so as to gather facts, to identify the problems that face the organization, to develop solutions to these problems, and to communicate these solutions to the search committee.  This process is categorized in three stages known as pre-interview research, interview strategies, and post-interview strategies.

During the pre-interview research you need to be extremely organized in your approach.  You will want to gather information about the job search, the search committee, and the organization. You will want to uncover the strengths, weakness, and challenges that face the organization, and find out who is on the search committee. You will want to research the members of the search committee and find out more about them.  For example, do you share commonalities with any of the members on the search committee? This could help you as you work towards building a positive relationship with each person you meet.   Additional pre-interview strategies include knowing when to interview, making sure you visit the interview site prior to your interview, and practicing your answers to potential interview questions.

During the actual interview, you will want to make a great first impression.  This includes arriving early to the interview, knowing what to wear (and what not to wear), being aware of your body language, knowing what to bring with you to the interview, and asking probing questions.  Once the interview is over, you will now need to begin to strategize on how you should follow-up with each person you met during the interview. You will begin by sending them a letter, note, or e-mail that thanks them for their time. You will also what to reiterate your qualifications, share with them why you are a good fit for the position, what strategies you have for solving their problems, and finishing your follow-up correspondence by letting them know that you want the job.

This is a brief outline of how you should approach the interview process. By knowing how to effectively approach your interview, you will be more prepared so you can perform your best. Ultimately, the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.execute4success.com.


*******

Best Selling Sports Careers Book

2nd edition Image

 

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Click Here To Purchase Only $23.95

.
“This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Creighton University