Five Stages Of The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you’re looking to break into, or advance within, the sports industry. But are you doing everything you can to conduct a successful job search? In my book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, I share a five-stage model that outlines the effective job search process. This model is based on research both within the sports industry and the best practices within the world of career development.

More specifically, the five segments of an effective job search include: (a) the self-assessment stage, (b) preparation stage, (c) connection stage, (d) interview stage, and (e) the follow-up stage. Mastering each of these components will help you to excel in the job search process and will help you to be competitive for the job you want. These five stages are explained in greater detail below

  • Self-Assessment Stage – In the self-assessment stage you will identify your strengths, weaknesses, skills and abilities. You will also understand what you like and dislike in a job, and what are your top personal traits. You will then create a plan that will lead you to achieving your dream job. Finally, you will systematically figure out which organizations you will want to contact in your job search.
  • Preparation Stage – During the preparation stage you will want to establish a target market contact list for the jobs you are seeking. You will also want to construct a professional resume, write a cover letter that can sell you, create a personal sales pitch, be strategic in which references you use, develop answers to the interview questions you are most likely to be asked, know how to research the organizations within your target market, and understand how to prepare for an interview.
  • Connection Stage – In the connection stage you will want to develop a job search campaign, understand how to network within the industry, and know how to promote yourself. You will also need to understand which promotional techniques you should use, how to create your brand, how to create a strategic marketing plan for yourself, and know how to control your job search.
  • Interview Stage – In the interview stage you will need to understand the proper approach for interviewing, the basic techniques you should use during an interview, and how to conduct yourself in a group interview. You will also want to understand what type of questions you should ask in the interview, what mistakes people make, and how to successfully close the interview.
  • Follow-up Stage – During this stage you will want to conduct a follow-up mini-campaign that includes thanking the members of the search committee and addressing any issues or concerns they may have about you as a candidate. You will also want to have an organized method for keeping track of each job you’ve applied for and the status of each of these searches.

These five stages are the major elements of the job search process. To land a job, you need to know, and be able to perform, each of the strategies and techniques that are within these five stages. To assist you in your job search, the book “Getting Hired in College Sports” is available as a resource. It identifies the techniques and strategies that are the best practices for all aspects of the job search process and it includes step-by-step worksheets that help you prepare for each stage of the job search. By performing these best practices you will be able to effectively execute the job search process. Best of luck on your upcoming job search!

 

Howard Gauthier is a Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 10 books and e-books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book The Positive Leader at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.

 

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The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  A must read for anyone whom has a goal of working in athletic administration”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Where To Begin Your Job Search – Answer These Four Questions

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

So you are beginning to look for a new job. Where do you start? How do you begin your job search? There are five stages to the job search process. These include the assessment stage, the preparation stage, the connection stage, the interview stage, and the follow-up stage. Each of these stages is so very different. To have a successful job search campaign, you will need to be able to effectively execute the fundamental skills for each of these different stages.

Everybody is at a different place in his or her job search. Some are just beginning their work life and they need to complete various self-assessments so they truly understand their personal strengths, skills, and abilities. Others need to understand how to prepare for a job search by understanding how to effectively write a cover letter and resume. Still others need to brush up on their interview skills and/or their follow-up skills.

To help you determine where to begin in your job search, and learn the appropriate job search skills, you should answer the following four questions to see which one best applies to you. By determining which of the four questions is closest to your situation, you can determine which stage of the job search process is the best place for you to focus your energies. I highly recommend that you do not skip any of the stages of the job search process, because the better you know yourself, and the better you know the job search strategies, the more likely you are to land the job of your dreams. But, by identifying where you should begin your job search, you can place the majority of your focus and energies in that particular stage of the job search process.

Questions

  1. I feel as if I am lost. I am not sure what type of job or career I want.
  2. I think I know what type of job I want, but is there a type of job that I am better suited for?
  3. I know what type of position is right for me, but I cannot get an interview.
  4. I am getting interviews but I cannot land the job.

Where Should You Begin?

If you answered #1 or #2, you need to initially focus on the testing and assessments stage. Once you have completed this stage and have a better understanding of your career path, you will begin to focus on the preparation stage. If you answered #3, your greatest focus needs to be on preparing for your search. Finally, if you answered #4, you need to review the information regarding interviewing skills and your follow-up strategies. You also need to look to expand into different types of markets within the sports industry.

By knowing which stage of the job search process you are in, you will be able to place the majority of your focus and energies in this area so you can learn and get better. You will be able to learn the fundamental skills and strategies of each stage of the job search process so you can effectively execute the various skills and strategies of the job search process. Good luck with your job search!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Ten Elements of an Effective Job Search Campaign

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Mark awoke before his I-phone’s alarm was set to go off at 6:45am.  He had a restless nights sleep because of his excitement for his informational interview with Thomas Griffin. Tom, as his friends referred to him, is a retired college athletic director who mentors young people in their search for a career in the sports industry.  Mark’s uncle had played college basketball with Tom in the late 1960’s and referred Mark to him.

Tom Griffin had a 40-year career as a college coach and athletic director, and he is now giving back to the community by mentoring young people who are interested in careers in college sports.  The two would meet at a local coffee shop where Tom does most of mentoring.

As Mark arrived at the coffee shop, Tom welcomed him with a bright smile and a firm handshake. After about 15 minutes of small talk and introductions, the two began to talk about working in college sports. Tom first described how college athletic departments are structured and then shared the different types of jobs that exist in an athletic department. As they continued with their discussions, Tom got into more detail about how to get a job in college sports. He identified 10 elements that are necessary for conducting a successful job search campaign.  He told Mark that these elements are from the book “Getting Hired in College Sports”.  He went on to say that it’s a “how to” book for the job seeker and Tom asks that each of his mentees get a copy so they can use the worksheets that are included.  As they continued with their conversation, Tom gave Mark a handout that listed these 10 job search elements. These elements are a necessity for job seekers to know in order to secure a job.  The following are the 10 elements that Tom shared with Mark:

  1. You must properly assess your skills, abilities, strengths and traits
  2. You need to properly plan your career
  3. You need to establish a target market for your job search campaign
  4. You need to effectively promote yourself with a well-written cover letter and resume
  5. You need to create a compelling Personal Sales Pitch
  6. You need to complete an Interview Preparation Form
  7. You need to prepare to answer interview questions
  8. You need to organize your job search campaign
  9. You need to know the proven strategies for executing a successful job interview
  10. You need to be strategic in following-up after your interview

The two continued to talk for over two hours and in the end they agreed to continue to work together so Mark can develop all 10 elements of the job search process. This will help him to position himself for an outstanding career in the world of college sports. For more information on the job search process, or the book “Getting Hired in College Sports”, feel free to contact Howard Gauthier at howard@sportscareersinstitute.com or go to his website at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University. He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach. He is also an author of 9 books. Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.sportscareersinstitute.com or his new book Execute for Success at www.ThePositiveLeader.org.  

*******

The #1 Careers Book in Sports

2nd edition Image

In Getting Hired In College Sports you will discover:

  • The types of jobs that exist in college sports
  • How to plan and navigate your career
  • How to create an effective job search campaign 
  • The proper way to create an effective resume, cover letter, and sales pitch
  • How to properly brand yourself
  • Techniques and strategies to prepare for your interview
  • How to properly prepare yourself for the five types of interview questions 
  • How to properly follow-up after the interview in order to influence the decision of the hiring manager

Only $23.95 Click Here To Purchase 

.
“I have recommended this book to many aspiring sports administrators.  This is a must read for anyone who wants to work in college athletics”

-Bill Fusco
Director of Athletics
Sonoma State University

 

 


Effectively Executing The Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

According to the book “Execute for Success”, execution is the process of effectively using skills, techniques and strategies to successfully perform your activities.  In the job search process, this means that you need to know, and be able to perform, the basic fundamental skills, strategies, and techniques of the job search process.

The job search process is composed of five segments that include: (a) the self-assessment stage, (b) preparation stage, (c) connection stage, (d) interview stage, and (e) the follow-up stage.  Mastering each of these components will help you to excel in the job search process and will help you to be competitive for the job you want.  More specifically, these five stages encompass:

 

  • Self-Assessment Stage – In the self-assessment stage you will identify your strengths, weaknesses, skills and abilities.  You will also understand what you like and dislike in a job, and what are your top personal traits.  You will then create a plan that will lead you to achieving your dream job.  Finally, you will systematically figure out which organizations you will want to contact in your job search.
  • Preparation Stage – During the preparation stage you will want to establish a target market contact list for the jobs you are seeking.  You will also want to construct a professional resume, write a cover letter that can sell you, create a personal sales pitch, be strategic in which references you use, develop answers to the interview questions you are most likely to be asked, know how to research the organizations within your target market, and understand how to prepare for an interview.
  • Connection Stage – In the connection stage you will want to develop a job search campaign, understand how to network within the industry, and know how to promote yourself.  You will also need to understand which promotional techniques you should use, how to create your brand, how to create a strategic marketing plan for yourself, and know how to control your job search.
  • Interview Stage – In the interview stage you will need to understand the proper approach for interviewing, the basic techniques you should use during an interview, and how to conduct yourself in a group interview.  You will also want to understand what type of questions you should ask in the interview, what mistakes people make, and how to successfully close the interview.
  • Follow-up Stage – During this stage you will want to conduct a follow-up mini-campaign that includes thanking the members of the search committee and addressing any issues or concerns they may have about you as a candidate.  You will also want to have an organized method for keeping track of each job you’ve applied for and the status of each of these searches.

These five stages are the major elements of the job search process.  To land a job, you will need to know, and be able to perform, the strategies and techniques that are within each of these five stages.  To assist you in your job search, the book “Getting Hired in College Sports” is available as a resource.  It identifies the techniques and strategies that are the best practices for all aspects of the job search process.  By performing these best practices you will be able to effectively execute the job search process.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at http://www.SportsCareersInsitute.com or his newest book Execute for Success at www.Execute4Success.com.

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Be Prepared When The Right Job Opens

2nd edition Image

 

Be prepared when the right job opens up.  Give yourself the book that provides you with the top job search skills and techniques.  It’s a competitive industry, so be prepared!

Click Here To PurchaseOnly $23.95

.

This book is fantastic – it is very practical for people who want to get into (or advance) in the sports industry.”

 -Greg McDermott 
  Head Basketball Coach 
  Creighton University


The Holiday Season is a Good Time For Your Job Search

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Roger was attending the office Christmas party but his mind was somewhere else.  He has been looking for another job for about two or three months with little success.  Roger decided to take a break from the job search process during the holiday season.  He reasoned that nobody was hiring so he would just take a month or so off and pick the search back up after the first of the year.  His mind, however, wouldn’t let it go.

As he was filling his cup at the punch bowl, Sara, a co-worker and friend, asked how the search was going. Roger explained that he was taking some time off and will pick it back up in a month.  Sara looked puzzled as she questioned his reasoning.

Sara went on to explain that Roger is falling into the same trap that many people fall into.  This “taking some time off” logic is the exact reason he should stay active in the job search process.  You see, when so many people take time away from being active in the job search process, there is less competition for each job, which makes it easier to get the position.  Couple this with the networking opportunities available during this time of year, and the holidays become a real good time for you to be active in the job market.

When looking for a job during the holiday season, keep these tips in mind:

  • The Holiday Season offers Networking Opportunities – This is because of the large number of parties, gatherings, and functions.  Take advantage of these opportunities but do it gracefully so you don’t appear to be using these events as your mini-job search campaign. 
  • Don’t Overdo the Punch – Have fun at the parties but don’t over do it.  Your brand and reputation are on the line.
  • Be Intentional in Building Relationships – One of your main focuses needs to be on building positive relationships with colleagues.  You will want to be purposeful in developing these relationships, yet be sincere in wanting to get to know them.  This means you should be very outgoing and friendly during the events, but don’t continue to look over their shoulder for the next person you can talk to.  Stay in the moment and build a relationship.
  • Your Image Counts – Look professional and don’t come dressed as Santa.  It’s great to have fun during these events, but whether you like it or not, you’re being judged.  People draw conclusions about you based on how you look, what you say, and what you do.  This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have fun; it just means that you shouldn’t take crazy pictures and post them to Facebook or grab the mic and make a fool out of yourself. 
  • Stay Active in the Job Search Process – Remember that the competition for each job is significantly reduced during this time of year.  Be the exception and continue to work your job search campaign.
  •  Know the Job Search Process – A job search goal that is easy for you to accomplish during this time of year is to brush up on your job search skills.  Know what your skills and abilities are.  Have your sales pitch written out, practiced, and down pat. Perfect your resume and cover letter.  Write out and practice your answers to interview questions.  Practice telling stories. In other words, read and prepare for all five stages of the job search process.  When asked what you’d like for Christmas, you might want to consider a new suit, new dress shoes, or a book on the elements that are associated with the job search process.

Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at http://www.SportsCareersInsitute.com or his newest book Execute for Success at www.Execute4Success.com.

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Understanding Which Stage Of the Job Search Process You’re In

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Tanya and Todd are both searching for a job in the sports world.  Tanya is a soccer coach who is looking to advance in her career and Todd recently graduated with a master’s degree in Sports Management.  While Tanya is very focused on her career, Todd isn’t sure what type of job he wants to pursue.

Tanya knows that she wants to advance in the coaching profession but is having a difficult time getting an interview.  Todd on the other hand is confused as to what type of job or career he wants.  They both seek the assistance of a career coach to help them with their search process.

The career coach shares that there are five stages to the job search process:

1.    Assessment Stage

2.    Preparation Stage

3.    Connection Stage

4.    Interviewing Stage

5.    Follow-up Stage

In Tanya’s situation, the career coach suggests that since she knows what type of job she is interested in, the majority of her energies should be focused on the preparation and connection stages.  The preparation stage would have her review her cover letter, resume, references, and sales pitch to make sure they are formatted correctly and written correctly.  She needs to make sure that her sales tools are excellent, and that they are effectively selling her.  The career coach continued by explaining that most jobs are secured through networking, and that the connection stage would help her to be active and effective in networking within the profession.

In Todd’s situation, the career coach suggested that he begin his job search process in the assessment stage.  He needs to understand the various types of jobs that exist in the sports industry, and to understand which type of job best fits his personality, skills, and lifestyle.  The career coach went on to share that during the assessment stage, Todd will also discover his strengths, weaknesses, skills, and abilities.  These will help him as he identifies what type of career he wants to pursue, and in developing his promotional materials.

The career coach also recommended that both Tanya and Todd spend the majority of their attention, at this point, within their specific job search stage, but that they familiarize themselves with the other stages as well.  This is so they will be prepared to interview when the time comes, and to properly follow-up after an interview.

So where should you begin?  If you are lost and not knowing what type of job you want – you’ll start with the assessment stage.  If you know what type of job you want but aren’t getting interviews – you’ll need to assess your situation and focus on both the preparation and connection stages.  And if you are getting interviews but not the job offers – you’ll want to focus on both the interviewing and follow-up stages.  The key is that you know the basic fundamental skills of each stage of the job search process and that you effectively perform these skills.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com or his new book, Execute for Success, at www.execute4success.com.

 

Organizing Your Job Search Campaign

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Editor’s Note:  The Coffee House Mentor is a series of 10 topics that discuss all aspects of the job search process. This is the ninth article in the series.  To review any of the previous articles, go to our Home Page at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.

As the group gathered for this week’s session, there was an odd feel in the air since Brian would no longer be in the mentoring meetings.  The group members were excited for Brian, but sad to see him go.  Rob knew how the mentees were feeling since so many of the previous coffee house mentees had moved on after successfully landing a job.

Last week’s meeting was extremely valuable for the group as they learned the various types of interview questions and how to answer them.  Today’s session would be just as important since the group would cover how to conduct a successful job search campaign.

Rob wanted to get started right away because the topic they were discussing covered so much information.  He began by sharing the importance of being organized in your job search campaign.  He defined a job search campaign as an organized method to promote yourself to the organizations within your target market.  He went on to say that an effective job search campaign has five stages that include:

  1. Identifying the objective(s) of your job search campaign
  2. Identifying the target market you are going to pursue
  3. Knowing the promotional techniques you will use
  4. Having the promotional materials you need
  5. Knowing how you will monitor and evaluate the campaign

Rob began to explain each of these fives steps or stages by stating “From the previous mentoring sessions you have already developed three of the five steps of your job search campaign. You have established the objective(s) for your campaign – to promote yourself to the organizations within your target market.  You have also identified the organizations that are in your target market.  Finally, you have created your promotional materials – your resume, your Personal Sales Pitch, the cover letter, and your list of references.”

He continued by stating “you have also prepared yourself to be able to answer interview questions, to ask questions, and to tell stories through developing your Interview Preparation Form.  Therefore, you are now ready for the fourth step, to develop the promotional strategies and techniques that will be used in your job search campaign.”  One of the most important aspects of an effective job search campaign is for you to properly promote yourself to the organizations that are in your target market.  Promoting yourself is letting people know about you, about your skills and competencies, and about your interests. There are two basic ways in which you can promote yourself – through developing your brand image, and through networking.  He continued by saying that branding and networking are such big topics, and they include several strategies within each area, that the group would need to wait and discuss these topics on another day.

The fifth and final step in the job search process is for you to monitor and evaluate your campaign.  You will want to monitor your campaign to make sure you are staying on target for implementing your job search strategies.  You will then want to evaluate the effectiveness of each strategy.  Finally, you will want to keep any strategy that works and adjust any strategy that didn’t work.  Rob wrapped things up by saying “The bottom line is you need to be prepared and organized.  Remember, the job will go to the candidate who is best prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.”  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com or his new book, Execute for Success, at www.execute4success.com.

Being Prepared For Interview Questions

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Editor’s Note:  The Coffee House Mentor is a series of 10 topics that discuss all aspects of the job search process.  This week’s blog is preparing you for answering interview questions.  This is the eighth article in the series.  To review any of the previous seven articles, go to our Home Page at http://www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.

Brian was excited to share his good news as the mentoring group arrived for their weekly meeting.  His interview earlier in the week went well and he was offered the job.  Brian accepted the position and is now the new Senior Web Designer at E. G. Enterprises.

The group shared in his excitement and they spent the first 10 minutes of the session wishing Brian well in his new ventures.  As the well-wishing was dying down, Cece asked what helped him the most in his actual interview session.  Brian was quick to explain how he learned how to properly and effectively answer interview questions in chapter seven in the book “Getting Hired in College Sports”.  Rob was familiar with this book from his days as an athletic director and had each mentee purchase a copy so they would be properly prepared for every aspect of the interview process.

Brian continued to explain what he had learned, and shared that there are five basic types of interview questions:

  • Personal questions
  • Competency-based questions
  • Performance-based questions
  •  Company-based questions
  •  Position-specific questions

He continued by sharing that personal questions focus on you and your personality.  This includes information on your background, your character, and your value system.  The intent of these questions is to find out if you would be a good fit within the organization.  An example of a personal question is “Tell me about yourself”.

Competency-based questions are designed to determine if you are qualified for the position.  They focus on your skills, abilities, strengths, and experiences.  An example of a competency-based question is “What are your strengths (or weaknesses)”.

Performance-based questions focus on how you have performed in your previous positions or how you would handle a specific problem.  These types of questions are also designed to see if you are qualified for the position and to see if you are a good fit within the organization.  An example of a performance-based question is “What is your greatest accomplishment”.

Company-based questions are designed to see if you will be a good fit within the organization.  They focus on why you want to work for that particular company.  Company-based questions can include “Why do you want to work for us” or “What distinguishes you from the other people we are interviewing today”.

Finally, the fifth type of interview question is a position-specific question.  They are designed to test your knowledge about the actual job.  An example of a position-specific question is “What is your management style”.

Brian went on to explain that in order to ace your interview, you will need to be prepared to answer questions from each of these five categories.  You will want to prepare yourself by writing out answers to possible interview questions and then practice reciting your answers.  This practice is important so you will be able to respond naturally and without hesitation to the questions asked by the search committee.  Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process. In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS! 

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com or his new book, Execute for Success, which will be released on October 1, 2013 and is currently available at a pre-publication discount at http://www.execute4success.com.

 

Identifying Your Target Market in the Job Search Process

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Editor’s Note:  The Coffee House Mentor is a series of 10 topics that discuss all aspects of the job search process.  This blog on targeting your search is the fourth article in the series.

Last week we discussed how Rick was extremely organized when he developed a plan for his career.  He had researched the steps and strategies that he would take in order to create an effective plan.  This research led him to identifying the process, and the corresponding strategies he could use, to attain his dream job.

Rob, the mentor of the group, built upon these thoughts and continued on by discussing the process for identifying the people and organizations a person should target in their job search campaign.  While many people wait for a job to open and then they apply for the position, Rob is teaching his five mentees the value of being proactive in their job search.  He reasons, “If you have already made contact with the people within an organization, when a job opens up you will have a leg up on your competition.   This is because you already know the people within the organization, and people hire people they know.”

To help Rob get his point across, he passed out three worksheets.  For the next 35 minutes, the group reviewed the worksheets and discussed the process of targeting the job you want.  The following are the three worksheets the group reviewed:

  • Establishing Your Target Market
  • Institutions Within Your Target Market
  •  Target Market Contact List

“Establishing Your Target Market” is the first worksheet they discussed.  This worksheet is a summary and review of the information that Rick presented earlier in the session.  This form has you outlining the type of position you want to pursue.  It includes the specifics about the organization such as the type of sports organization, the level of competition, the geographic location, and the size of the community.  Rob went on to say that “Once you have identified this information, you will move on to the second worksheet which is entitled “Institutions Within Your Target Market.”

This second worksheet has you identifying each organization that meets the criteria from the first worksheet.  For example, if you are interested in working at an NCAA Division I institution within the state of Washington, your target market will include Eastern Washington University, Gonzaga University, Seattle University, University of Washington, and Washington State University.  If your criteria also includes that the organization has football, then you have narrowed your list to Eastern, UW, and WSU.  Once you have listed every institution within your target market, you will now move on to the third worksheet.

The third worksheet, entitled “Target Market Contact List”, has you identifying the name of the organization and contact information of the supervisor or manager you will want to connect with.  Once you have organized your target list and identified the contact information, you will now want to create a strategy for how you will network with the people within the organization.  This networking is key for eventually getting a job in the company.

By knowing where you want to work, you can identify the people you want to network with in order to build a relationship.  This information is helping the mentees to become very organized in their job search process.  Rob instructed each mentee to insert the three new worksheets into the fourth section of their worksheet binder.

For more information about the job search process, please contact Howard Gauthier at howard@sportscareersinstitute.com or go to our website at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.  Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

 

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his latest book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.

 

Planning Your Career

By Dr. Howard Gauthier

Editor’s Note:  The Coffee House Mentor is a series of 10 topics that discuss all aspects of the job search process.  This blog on career planning is the third article of the series.

As the career mentoring group gathered for this week’s meeting, the group was prepared to have a strong discussion about how to properly and effectively plan their career.  Rob, the mentor and leader of the group, began the session by asking the group members if they knew what their ultimate career goal was, and if they knew how to position themselves to achieve this goal.

Two of the mentees had a pretty clear concept of what they wanted in a career and two were really trying to discover their way in life.  But Rick knew exactly what he wanted.  He wanted to pursue coaching and wanted to coach basketball at the Division I level.  He went on to say “When I was first fired as the head coach at the local high school, I was confused and didn’t know if I still wanted to coach.  However, as I reflected upon my strengths and weaknesses, I knew that my strengths are in teaching and coaching young people.  In fact, I love the game, I love teaching and coaching, and the firing might be the prodding I needed to help me pursue my dreams and passions.”

Rick went on to discuss a formula he uncovered for mapping out his career and a step-by-step process to help guide him as he planned a career toward becoming a basketball coach at the Division I level.  This formula for planning your career includes four steps and several strategies on how you should plan and position yourself for your dream job.  These steps and strategies include:

Step One:  Identifying Your Dream Job.  This includes identifying the following elements,

  • Type of Position (e.g. basketball coach)
  • Industry (e.g. college level)
  • Type of Institution (e.g. Public/Private, 2-year/4-year)
  • Level of Competition (e.g. NCAA Division I)
  • Where You Want to Live (e.g. region of the country)
  • Size of the Community (e.g. urban or rural)

As you continue on in this four-step process, you will want to research which organizations meet the above criteria for your career.  You should list these organizations in a personal notebook.

Step Two:  How To Get There.  As you plan for your dream job, research and identify the type of education, experience, and skills you will need in order to be hired for this position.

Step Three:  Positioning Yourself.  Working backwards, what type of positions will lead to your dream job?  The assumption is that you are just beginning your career and that your dream job is approximately 10-15 years into the future.  This also assumes that it will take approximately four career moves before you reach your dream job.  These assumptions will change depending upon where you currently are in your career.  Therefore, it might only take two moves instead of four.  With this in mind, work backwards from your “dream” situation in step one, and identify what the logical job would be that could lead to your career goal.  This is your “One-Position Removed” job. List this position in your notebook.  Continue on with this format and identify the type of employment that would lead to your one-position removed job.  This is your “Two-Positions Removed” job.  You will also want to list this in your notebook.  Complete this process by identifying your 2-Year Career Goal.  Your 2-year goal should lead to your “Two-Positions Removed” job and is the job you want to secure within the next two years.  List this position in your notebook.

Step Four:  Your Current Situation.  In this step you will list your current position and then identify the strategies you need to employ in order to become hired into your next position within two years.  These strategies can include:

  • Repositioning yourself within the industry
  • Obtaining an entry level Job
  • Staying in your current position and begin a networking plan
  • Volunteer to gain experience
  • Attend Graduate/Undergraduate School
  • Complete an internship (paid or unpaid)
  • Find a mentor who can give you perspective and advice

These four steps gave Rick the necessary process and strategies that allowed him to gain a clear focus into attaining his dream job.  The mentoring group was pleased with Rick’s input and Rob continued on by discussing the process for identifying the people and organizations you should target in your job search campaign.  This will be discussed in next week’s blog.

For more information about the job search process, please contact Howard Gauthier at howard@sportscareersinstitute.com or go to our website at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.  Remember, ultimately the job will go to the candidate who is prepared and who effectively executes the basics of the job interview process.  In all you do, you will want to EXECUTE FOR SUCCESS!

Howard Gauthier is an Associate Professor of Athletic Administration at Idaho State University.  He is a former collegiate athletic director and collegiate basketball coach.  He is also an author of 9 books.  Check out his latest book, Getting Hired In College Sports – 2nd Edition at www.SportsCareersInstitute.com.